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I''ve Heard the Vultures Singing : Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature

By: Perillo, Lucia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Trinity University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (225 p.).ISBN: 9781595340924.Subject(s): American poetry | Perillo, Lucia Maria, -- 1958 | Poets, American -- 20th century -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: I''ve Heard the Vultures Singing : Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and NatureDDC classification: 814.54 LOC classification: PS3566.E69146 .P384 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; A Glimpse; Knowledge game: Gulls; Definition of Terms; Medicine; Job versus Prometheus; Inside/Outside; A Cripple in the Wilderness; Fear of the Market; Knowledge game: Bats; Brief History of My Thumb; Bonnie Without Clyde: The Romance of Being Bad; Sick Fuck; Two-Man Boat; Knowledge game: Birdsong; On Solitude; From the Bardo Zone; SOURCES
Summary: Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis down the wild slopes of Mount Rainier, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was in her thirties. I''ve Heard the Vultures Singing is a clear-eyed and brazenly outspoken examination of her life as a person with disabilities. In unwavering and witty prose, and without a trace of self-pity, she contemplates the bitter ironies of being unable to walk, what it's like to experience eros as a sick person, how to lower one's expectations for a wilderness experience, and how to deal with the vagaries of a disease that has no predictable trajectory. Masterfully written, the essays resonate with lovers of literature and nature, and with anyone who has dealt with disadvantages of the body or the hard-luck limitations of ordinary life.
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CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; A Glimpse; Knowledge game: Gulls; Definition of Terms; Medicine; Job versus Prometheus; Inside/Outside; A Cripple in the Wilderness; Fear of the Market; Knowledge game: Bats; Brief History of My Thumb; Bonnie Without Clyde: The Romance of Being Bad; Sick Fuck; Two-Man Boat; Knowledge game: Birdsong; On Solitude; From the Bardo Zone; SOURCES

Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis down the wild slopes of Mount Rainier, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was in her thirties. I''ve Heard the Vultures Singing is a clear-eyed and brazenly outspoken examination of her life as a person with disabilities. In unwavering and witty prose, and without a trace of self-pity, she contemplates the bitter ironies of being unable to walk, what it's like to experience eros as a sick person, how to lower one's expectations for a wilderness experience, and how to deal with the vagaries of a disease that has no predictable trajectory. Masterfully written, the essays resonate with lovers of literature and nature, and with anyone who has dealt with disadvantages of the body or the hard-luck limitations of ordinary life.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lucia Perillo was born in Manhattan, New York on September 30, 1958. She received a bachelor's degree in wildlife management from McGill University in 1979 and went to work for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. She received a master's degree in English from Syracuse University while working seasonally at Mount Rainer National Park. She taught at Syracuse University, Southern Illinois University, Saint Martin's University, and Warren Wilson College. <p> She was a poet and essayist. She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1988 and published her first book, Dangerous Life, a year later. Her collections of poetry include Inseminating the Elephant, which won the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry from the Library of Congress, and Time Will Clean the Carcass Bones: Selected and New Poems. She was also the author of a book of essays entitled I've Heard the Vultures Singing and a short story collection entitled Happiness Is a Chemical on the Brain. In 2000, she received a MacArthur Genius fellowship. She died on October 16, 2016 at the age of 58. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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