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Stalking the Subject : Modernism and the Animal

By: Rohman, Carrie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (209 p.).ISBN: 9780231518567.Subject(s): Animals - Symbolic aspects | Animals -- Symbolic aspects | Animals in literature | Animals in literature | Darwin, Charles - Influence | English literature - 19th century - History and criticism | English literature - 20th century - History and criticism | English literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Ethics in literature | Evolution (Biology) in literature | Freud, Sigmund - Influence | Human-animal relationships in literature | Human-animal relationships in literature | Modernism (Literature) - Great Britain | Modernism (Literature) -- Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stalking the Subject : Modernism and the AnimalDDC classification: 820.9/362 | 820.9362 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. The Animal Among Others; 2. Imperialism and Disavowal; 3. Facing the Animal; 4. Recuperating the Animal; 5. Revising the Human; Conclusion: Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: Human and animal subjectivity converge in a historically unprecedented way within modernism, as evolutionary theory, imperialism, antirationalism, and psychoanalysis all grapple with the place of the human in relation to the animal. Drawing on the thought of Jacques Derrida and Georges Bataille, Carrie Rohman outlines the complex philosophical and ethical stakes involved in theorizing the animal in humanism, including the difficulty in determining an ontological place for the animal, the question of animal consciousness and language, and the paradoxical status of the human as both a primate body and a "human" mind abstracting itself from the physical and material world. Rohman then turns to the work of Joseph Conrad, D. H. Lawrence, H. G. Wells, and Djuna Barnes, authors who were deeply invested in the relationship between animality and identity. The Island of Dr. Moreau embodies a Darwinian nightmare of the evolutionary continuum; The Croquet Player thematizes the dialectic between evolutionary theory and psychoanalysis; and Women in Love, St. Mawr, and Nightwood all refuse to project animality onto others, inverting the traditional humanist position by valuing animal consciousness. A novel treatment of the animal in literature, Stalking the Subject provides vital perspective on modernism''s most compelling intellectual and philosophical issues.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR478.M6 R65 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=908731 Available EBL908731

Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. The Animal Among Others; 2. Imperialism and Disavowal; 3. Facing the Animal; 4. Recuperating the Animal; 5. Revising the Human; Conclusion: Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities; Notes; Works Cited; Index

Human and animal subjectivity converge in a historically unprecedented way within modernism, as evolutionary theory, imperialism, antirationalism, and psychoanalysis all grapple with the place of the human in relation to the animal. Drawing on the thought of Jacques Derrida and Georges Bataille, Carrie Rohman outlines the complex philosophical and ethical stakes involved in theorizing the animal in humanism, including the difficulty in determining an ontological place for the animal, the question of animal consciousness and language, and the paradoxical status of the human as both a primate body and a "human" mind abstracting itself from the physical and material world. Rohman then turns to the work of Joseph Conrad, D. H. Lawrence, H. G. Wells, and Djuna Barnes, authors who were deeply invested in the relationship between animality and identity. The Island of Dr. Moreau embodies a Darwinian nightmare of the evolutionary continuum; The Croquet Player thematizes the dialectic between evolutionary theory and psychoanalysis; and Women in Love, St. Mawr, and Nightwood all refuse to project animality onto others, inverting the traditional humanist position by valuing animal consciousness. A novel treatment of the animal in literature, Stalking the Subject provides vital perspective on modernism''s most compelling intellectual and philosophical issues.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this book, Rohman (Lafayette College) makes an important contribution to both modernist literary studies and the developing field of animal studies. Informed by such theorists as Jacques Derrida and Cary Wolfe, and the psychoanalytic theory of Slavoj Zizek, the book focuses on (typically canonical) texts by a wide range of Anglo-American modernist authors, including H. G. Wells, T. S. Eliot, Joseph Conrad, and D. H. Lawrence. Early chapters concentrate on modernist writers' engagement with evolutionary theory and imperialism, but perhaps Rohman's most valuable contribution is her analysis of Lawrence's "posthumanism." Though brief, Rohman's speculative conclusion, "Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities," is one of the volume's more useful discussions. Rohman engages with a substantial amount of theory and scholarship on individual authors, but the book remains accessible to any determined reader due to her engaging, clear writing style and her compelling critical readings of specific modernist texts. This study nicely complements recent work on Victorian responses to animals, for example, Victorian Animal Dreams: Representations of Animals in Victorian Literature and Culture, ed. by Deborah Denenholz Morse and Martin Danahay (CH, May'08, 45-4845). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. D. Morrison Morehead State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carrie Rohman is assistant professor of English at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.

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