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Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins [electronic resource] : Black Daughter of the Revolution

By: Brown, Lois.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Gender and American Culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (705 p.).ISBN: 9781469606569.Subject(s): African American journalists | African American journalists -- Biography | African American women - Intellectual life | African American women -- Intellectual life | African American women authors | African American women authors -- Biography | African Americans - History - 1877-1964 | African Americans -- History -- 1877-1964 | African Americans in literature | African Americans in literature | Authors, American - 19th century | Authors, American -- 19th century -- Biography | Authors, American - 20th century | Authors, American -- 20th century -- Biography | Hopkins, Pauline E | Hopkins, Pauline E. (Pauline Elizabeth) | Racism - United States - History - 20th century | Racism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States - Race relations - History - 20th century | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins : Black Daughter of the RevolutionDDC classification: 818.409 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Black Daughter, Black History; 2. Patriarchal Facts and Fictions; 3. The Creation of a Boston Family; 4. Progressive Arts and the Public Sphere; 5. Dramatic Freedom: The Slaves' Escape; or,The Underground Railroad; 6. Spectacular Matters: "Boston's Favorite Colored Soprano" and Entertainment Culture in New England; 7. Literary Advocacy: Women's Work, Race Activism, and Lynching; 8. For Humanity: The Public Work of Contending Forces; 9. Contending Forces as Ancestral Narrative; 10. Cooperative Enterprises
11. (Wo)Manly Testimony: The Colored American Magazine and Public History12. Love, Loss, and the Reconstitution of Paradise: Hagar's Daughter and the Work of Mystery; 13. "Boyish Hopes" and the Politics of Brotherhood: Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest; 14. The Souls and Spirits of Black Folk: Pan-Africanism and Racial Recovery in Of One Blood and Other Writings; 15. Witness to the Truth: The Public and Private Demise of the Colored American Magazine; 16. The Colored American Magazine in New York City; 17. New Alliances: Pauline Hopkins and the Voice of the Negro
18. Well Known as a Race Writer: Pauline Hopkins as Public Intellectual19. The New Era Magazine and a "Singlewoman of Boston"; 20. Cambridge Days; Appendix 1. Speeches; Appendix 2. Letters; Appendix 3. Review of Contending Forces; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins: Black Daughter of the Revolution
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Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Black Daughter, Black History; 2. Patriarchal Facts and Fictions; 3. The Creation of a Boston Family; 4. Progressive Arts and the Public Sphere; 5. Dramatic Freedom: The Slaves' Escape; or,The Underground Railroad; 6. Spectacular Matters: "Boston's Favorite Colored Soprano" and Entertainment Culture in New England; 7. Literary Advocacy: Women's Work, Race Activism, and Lynching; 8. For Humanity: The Public Work of Contending Forces; 9. Contending Forces as Ancestral Narrative; 10. Cooperative Enterprises

11. (Wo)Manly Testimony: The Colored American Magazine and Public History12. Love, Loss, and the Reconstitution of Paradise: Hagar's Daughter and the Work of Mystery; 13. "Boyish Hopes" and the Politics of Brotherhood: Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest; 14. The Souls and Spirits of Black Folk: Pan-Africanism and Racial Recovery in Of One Blood and Other Writings; 15. Witness to the Truth: The Public and Private Demise of the Colored American Magazine; 16. The Colored American Magazine in New York City; 17. New Alliances: Pauline Hopkins and the Voice of the Negro

18. Well Known as a Race Writer: Pauline Hopkins as Public Intellectual19. The New Era Magazine and a "Singlewoman of Boston"; 20. Cambridge Days; Appendix 1. Speeches; Appendix 2. Letters; Appendix 3. Review of Contending Forces; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins: Black Daughter of the Revolution

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

At the turn of the 20th century, Hopkins (1859-1930) was among the most significant African American journalists and fiction writers of her time. Her reputation went into a steep decline as the century proceeded, and she died in relative obscurity. In the 1970s interest in Hopkins revived, and it has continued to grow, culminating in Hanna Wallinger's Pauline E. Hopkins (CH, Mar'06, 43-3915). The present biography is much fuller than Wallinger's: Brown (Mount Holyoke College) includes not only excellent readings of her novels (especially Hagar's Daughter and Contending Forces) but also much new information about Hopkins's ancestry and her later years. She details Hopkins's years at the Colored American Magazine (1900-09), which published most of her work; her interest in Pan-Africanism; and her contentious relationship with Booker T. Washington. Appendixes, particularly one on Hopkins's correspondence, provide useful insights into the writer's thinking. The major problem with the book is its omissions; e.g., Brown seems unaware of Wallinger's biography and does not cite pioneering work by Ann Allen Shockley and Mary Helen Washington in her bibliography. These oversights aside, this biography includes much new material and, coupled with Wallinger's book, provides a solid base for future study. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through graduate students; general readers. L. J. Parascandola Long Island University

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