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The Past Is Not Dead : Essays from the Southern Quarterly

By: Chambers, Douglas B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2012Description: 1 online resource (416 p.).ISBN: 9781617033056.Subject(s): American literature - Southern States - | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Southern quarterly | Southern States -- Civilization | Southern States -- History | Southern States - In literature | Southern States -- In literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Past Is Not Dead : Essays from the <i>Southern Quarterly</i>DDC classification: 814.54080975 | 814/.54080975 LOC classification: PS261 .P37 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; CONTENTS; FOREWORD; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION: The Southern Quarterly and Southern Studies The Voice of Humane Learning; Part I: 1960s; Levee Building and the Settlement of the Yazoo Basin; From Enchantment to Disillusionment: A Southern Editor Views the New Deal; Some Mississippi Views of American Federalism, 1817-1900; Part II: 1970s; "Harmony with the Dead": James Dickey's Descent into the Underworld; Pat Harrison and the Social Security Act of 1935; The Southern Belle as an Antebellum Ideal; A Sense of Place and the Americanization of Mississippi; Part III: 1980s
Cable's The Grandissimes: A Literary Pioneer Confronts the Southern TraditionSouthern Writers: Notes Toward a Definition of Terms; "Tough Times": Downhome Blues Recordings as Folk History; The Black Faith of W. E. B. Du Bois: Sociocultural and Political Dimensions of Black Religion; Subverting History: Women, Narrative, and Patriarchy in Absalom, Absalom!; Part IV: 1990s; On Welty's Use of Allusion: Expectations and Their Revision in "The Wide Net," The Robber Bridegroom, and "At The Landing."; Natchez and Richard Wright in Southern American Literature
The Mississippi Frontier in Faulkner's Fiction and in FactUnlinking Race and Gender: The Awakening as a Southern Novel; Part V: 2000s; "When Is an Ocean not an Ocean?" Geographies of the Atlantic World; The Southern Way of Death: The Meaning of Death in Antebellum White Evangelical Culture; Africa and the American South: Culinary Connections; Harriet Jacobs at Home in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; James Agee, Walker Evans, and the Dialectic of Documentary Representation in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S
TV; W; Y
Summary: The Past Is Not Dead is a collection of twenty-one literary and historical essays that will mark the 50th anniversary of the Southern Quarterly, one of the oldest scholarly journals (founded in 1962) dedicated to southern studies. Like its companion volume, Personal Souths, The Past Is Not Dead features the best of the work published in the journal. Essays represent every decade of the journal''s history, from the 1960s to the 2000s. Topics covered range from historical essays on the French and Indian War, the New Deal, and Emmett Till''s influence on the Black Panther Party to literary figures including William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Richard Wright, Eudora Welty and Carson McCullers. Important regional subjects like the Natchez Trace, the Yazoo Basin, the Choctaw Indians, and Mississippi blues are given special attention. Contributors range from noted literary critics such as Margaret Walker Alexander, Virginia Spencer Carr, Susan V. Donaldson, James Justus, and Willie Morris to scholars of African-American studies such as Robert L. Hall and Manning Marble and historians including John Ray Skates, Martha Swain, and Randy Sparks. Collectively, the essays in this volume enrich and illuminate our understanding of southern history, literature, and culture.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS261 .P37 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=939890 Available EBL939890

Cover; CONTENTS; FOREWORD; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION: The Southern Quarterly and Southern Studies The Voice of Humane Learning; Part I: 1960s; Levee Building and the Settlement of the Yazoo Basin; From Enchantment to Disillusionment: A Southern Editor Views the New Deal; Some Mississippi Views of American Federalism, 1817-1900; Part II: 1970s; "Harmony with the Dead": James Dickey's Descent into the Underworld; Pat Harrison and the Social Security Act of 1935; The Southern Belle as an Antebellum Ideal; A Sense of Place and the Americanization of Mississippi; Part III: 1980s

Cable's The Grandissimes: A Literary Pioneer Confronts the Southern TraditionSouthern Writers: Notes Toward a Definition of Terms; "Tough Times": Downhome Blues Recordings as Folk History; The Black Faith of W. E. B. Du Bois: Sociocultural and Political Dimensions of Black Religion; Subverting History: Women, Narrative, and Patriarchy in Absalom, Absalom!; Part IV: 1990s; On Welty's Use of Allusion: Expectations and Their Revision in "The Wide Net," The Robber Bridegroom, and "At The Landing."; Natchez and Richard Wright in Southern American Literature

The Mississippi Frontier in Faulkner's Fiction and in FactUnlinking Race and Gender: The Awakening as a Southern Novel; Part V: 2000s; "When Is an Ocean not an Ocean?" Geographies of the Atlantic World; The Southern Way of Death: The Meaning of Death in Antebellum White Evangelical Culture; Africa and the American South: Culinary Connections; Harriet Jacobs at Home in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; James Agee, Walker Evans, and the Dialectic of Documentary Representation in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S

TV; W; Y

The Past Is Not Dead is a collection of twenty-one literary and historical essays that will mark the 50th anniversary of the Southern Quarterly, one of the oldest scholarly journals (founded in 1962) dedicated to southern studies. Like its companion volume, Personal Souths, The Past Is Not Dead features the best of the work published in the journal. Essays represent every decade of the journal''s history, from the 1960s to the 2000s. Topics covered range from historical essays on the French and Indian War, the New Deal, and Emmett Till''s influence on the Black Panther Party to literary figures including William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Richard Wright, Eudora Welty and Carson McCullers. Important regional subjects like the Natchez Trace, the Yazoo Basin, the Choctaw Indians, and Mississippi blues are given special attention. Contributors range from noted literary critics such as Margaret Walker Alexander, Virginia Spencer Carr, Susan V. Donaldson, James Justus, and Willie Morris to scholars of African-American studies such as Robert L. Hall and Manning Marble and historians including John Ray Skates, Martha Swain, and Randy Sparks. Collectively, the essays in this volume enrich and illuminate our understanding of southern history, literature, and culture.

Description based upon print version of record.

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