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From Birdwomen to Skygirls : American Girls'' Aviation Stories

By: Erisman, Fred.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Fort Worth : TCU Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (289 p.).ISBN: 9780875654805.Subject(s): Aeronautics in literature | American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Children’s literature in series -- History and criticism | Children’s stories, American -- History and criticism | Flight attendants in literature | Sex role -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women air pilots in literature | Women in aeronautics -- United States -- History | Young adult fiction, American -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From Birdwomen to Skygirls : American Girls'' Aviation StoriesDDC classification: 813.509356 | 813/.509356 LOC classification: PS374.A37 E76 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Illustrations; Preface; Notes; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: Formula Stories and Young Readers:1900-1930; Chapter 2: Birdwomen Take to the Air: 1905-1915; Chapter 3: The Earhart Era: 1925 -1940; Chapter 4: Amelia's Daughters Face Reality: 1930-1940; Chapter 5: The Stewardess Enters the Scene: 1930-1945; Chapter 6: World War II, Working Women, and Aviation:1940-1960; Chapter 7: Epilogue; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Close on the heels of the American public's early enthusiasm over the airplane came aviation stories for the young. From 1910 until the early 1960s, they exalted flight and painted the airplane as the most modern and adventuresome of machines. Most of the books were directed at boys; however, a substantial number sought a girls' audience.Erisman's account of several aviation series and other aviation books for girls fills a gap in the history and criticism of American popular culture. It examines the stories of girls who took to the sky, of the sources where authors found their inspiration, and of the evolution of aviation as an enterprise open to all.From the heady days of early aviation through the glory days of commercial air travel, girls' aviation books trace American women's participation in the field. They also reflect changes in women's roles and status in American society as the sex sought greater equality with men.As aviation technology improved, the birdwomen of the pre-World War I era, capable and independent-minded, gave way to individualistic 1930s adventurers patterned on Amelia Earhart, Jacqueline Cochran, and other feminine notables of the air.Their stories lead directly into the coming of commercial air travel. Career stories paint the increasingly glamorous world of the 1940s and 1950s airline stewardess, the unspoken assumptions lying behind that profession, and the inexorable effects of technological and economic change.By recovering these largely forgotten books and the social debates surrounding women's flying, Erisman makes a substantial contribution to aviation history, women's history, and the study of juvenile literature.This first comprehensive study of a long-overlooked topic recalls aviation experiences long past and poses provocative questions about Americans' attitudes toward women and how those attitudes were conveyed to the young.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS374.A37 E76 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1077373 Available EBL1077373

Contents; Illustrations; Preface; Notes; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: Formula Stories and Young Readers:1900-1930; Chapter 2: Birdwomen Take to the Air: 1905-1915; Chapter 3: The Earhart Era: 1925 -1940; Chapter 4: Amelia's Daughters Face Reality: 1930-1940; Chapter 5: The Stewardess Enters the Scene: 1930-1945; Chapter 6: World War II, Working Women, and Aviation:1940-1960; Chapter 7: Epilogue; Bibliography; Index

Close on the heels of the American public's early enthusiasm over the airplane came aviation stories for the young. From 1910 until the early 1960s, they exalted flight and painted the airplane as the most modern and adventuresome of machines. Most of the books were directed at boys; however, a substantial number sought a girls' audience.Erisman's account of several aviation series and other aviation books for girls fills a gap in the history and criticism of American popular culture. It examines the stories of girls who took to the sky, of the sources where authors found their inspiration, and of the evolution of aviation as an enterprise open to all.From the heady days of early aviation through the glory days of commercial air travel, girls' aviation books trace American women's participation in the field. They also reflect changes in women's roles and status in American society as the sex sought greater equality with men.As aviation technology improved, the birdwomen of the pre-World War I era, capable and independent-minded, gave way to individualistic 1930s adventurers patterned on Amelia Earhart, Jacqueline Cochran, and other feminine notables of the air.Their stories lead directly into the coming of commercial air travel. Career stories paint the increasingly glamorous world of the 1940s and 1950s airline stewardess, the unspoken assumptions lying behind that profession, and the inexorable effects of technological and economic change.By recovering these largely forgotten books and the social debates surrounding women's flying, Erisman makes a substantial contribution to aviation history, women's history, and the study of juvenile literature.This first comprehensive study of a long-overlooked topic recalls aviation experiences long past and poses provocative questions about Americans' attitudes toward women and how those attitudes were conveyed to the young.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Also author of, among other works on children's books, Boys' Books, Boys' Dreams, and the Mystique of Flight (2006)--which examines early-20th-century boys' formula books about flying--Erisman (Texas Christian Univ.) here provides an analysis of girls' aviation stories during the early 1900s. He considers a number of issues pertinent to children's literature--including the historical development of the series book and the way the aviation stories address changing views of social restrictions for girls--and provides a historical overview of women's roles in the field of aviation. The author integrates historical, social, and literary analyses as he explores the relationships between the aviation-series novels, magazines of the time period, real female pilots, and other roles open to women in aviation during the period (for example, he devotes a chapter to "stewardesses" and another to working women of WW II). This book furthers research on girls' formula stories, as seen previously in Pioneers, Passionate Ladies, and Private Eyes: Dime Novels, Series Books, and Paperbacks, ed. by Larry Sullivan and Lydia Cushman Schurman (1996). Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. T. L. Stowell Adrian College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>FRED ERISMAN holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Minnesota and taught for thirty-five years at Texas Christian University. He held the Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, during the 2002-2003 year.</p> <p>A specialist in American popular literature and culture, he has published numerous studies of science fiction, technological fiction, detective and suspense fiction, and the western. Erisman is the author of Boys' Books, Boys' Dreams, and the Mystique of Flight . He lives in Fort Worth.</p>

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