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Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright : The Poetics and Politics of Modernism

By: Weiss, M. Lynn.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 1998Description: 1 online resource (165 p.).ISBN: 9781604737721.Subject(s): African Americans - Intellectual life - 20th century | American literature - 20th century - History and criticism | Americans - France - History - 20th century | Authors, American - 20th century - Biography | Minorities in literature | Poetics - History - 20th century | Politics and literature - United States - History - 20th century | Stein, Gertrude - Criticism and interpretation | Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946 -- Criticism and interpretation | Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946 -- Friends and associates | Women and literature - United States - History - 20th century | Wright, Richard - Criticism and interpretation | Wright, Richard, 1908-1960 -- Criticism and interpretation | Wright, Richard, 1908-1960 -- Friends and associatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright : The Poetics and Politics of ModernismDDC classification: 818.5209 | 818/.5209 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1 Two Lives: Modernism and the Stein/Wright Connection; 2 Innocents Abroad: Gertrude Stein''s Paris France and Richard Wright''s Pagan Spain; 3 American Odyssey: Richard Wright''s Black Power and Gertrude Stein''s Everybody''s Autobiography; 4 Lecture Notes: Gertrude Stein''s Lectures in America and Richard Wright''s White Man, Listen!; Conclusion; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z
Summary: After the Second World War Gertrude Stein asked a friend''s support in securing a visa for Richard Wright to visit Paris. "I''ve got to help him, she said. You see, we are both members of a minority group." The brief, little-noted friendship of Stein and Wright began in 1945 with a letter. Over the next fifteen months, the two kept up a lively correspondence which culminated in Wright''s visit to Paris in May 1946 and ended with Stein''s death a few months later. Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright began their careers as marginals within marginalized groups, and their desire to live peacefully in unorthodox marriages led them away from America and into permanent exile in France. Still the obvious differences between them-in class, ethnic and racial origins, and in artistic expression-beg the question: What was there to talk about? This question opens a window onto each writer''s meditations on the influence of racial, ethnic, national origins on the formation of identity in a modern and post-modern world. The intuitive and intellectual affinities between Stein and Wright are illuminated in several works of non-fiction. Stein''s Paris France and Wright''s Pagan Spain are meditations on expatriation and creativity. Their so-called homecoming narratives-Stein''s Everybody''s Autobiography and Wright''s Black Power --examine concepts of racial and national identity in a post-modernist world. Respectively in Lectures in America and White Man, Listen! Stein and Wright outline the ways in which the poetics and politics of modernism are inextricably bound. At the close of the twentieth century the meditations of Stein and Wright on the protean quality of individual identity and its artistic, social, and political expression explore the most prescient and pressing issues of our time and beyond. M. Lynn Weiss is an assistant professor of English and African-American literature at Washington University.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS3537.T323 Z913 1998 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1078742 Available EBL1078742

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1 Two Lives: Modernism and the Stein/Wright Connection; 2 Innocents Abroad: Gertrude Stein''s Paris France and Richard Wright''s Pagan Spain; 3 American Odyssey: Richard Wright''s Black Power and Gertrude Stein''s Everybody''s Autobiography; 4 Lecture Notes: Gertrude Stein''s Lectures in America and Richard Wright''s White Man, Listen!; Conclusion; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z

After the Second World War Gertrude Stein asked a friend''s support in securing a visa for Richard Wright to visit Paris. "I''ve got to help him, she said. You see, we are both members of a minority group." The brief, little-noted friendship of Stein and Wright began in 1945 with a letter. Over the next fifteen months, the two kept up a lively correspondence which culminated in Wright''s visit to Paris in May 1946 and ended with Stein''s death a few months later. Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright began their careers as marginals within marginalized groups, and their desire to live peacefully in unorthodox marriages led them away from America and into permanent exile in France. Still the obvious differences between them-in class, ethnic and racial origins, and in artistic expression-beg the question: What was there to talk about? This question opens a window onto each writer''s meditations on the influence of racial, ethnic, national origins on the formation of identity in a modern and post-modern world. The intuitive and intellectual affinities between Stein and Wright are illuminated in several works of non-fiction. Stein''s Paris France and Wright''s Pagan Spain are meditations on expatriation and creativity. Their so-called homecoming narratives-Stein''s Everybody''s Autobiography and Wright''s Black Power --examine concepts of racial and national identity in a post-modernist world. Respectively in Lectures in America and White Man, Listen! Stein and Wright outline the ways in which the poetics and politics of modernism are inextricably bound. At the close of the twentieth century the meditations of Stein and Wright on the protean quality of individual identity and its artistic, social, and political expression explore the most prescient and pressing issues of our time and beyond. M. Lynn Weiss is an assistant professor of English and African-American literature at Washington University.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Weiss's book operates in at least three fields: theory of modernism, black studies, and Gertrude Stein explication. Weiss (Washington Univ.) handles the modernism per se rather cursorily, but his application of modernism to specific works compensates for that. The author treats parallels, comparisons, and contrasts using paired works by Wright and Stein. The emphasis is less on black or feminist than on expatriate pursuit of identity-in-writing. Stein's Paris France is paired with Wright's Pagan Spain; her Everybody's Autobiography with his Black Power; her Lectures in America with his White Man, Listen. The parallels are sometimes startling and always informative. Weiss's approach to Wright is more biographical and detailed than his approach to Stein, whom he treats more theoretically and generally. The study is nonetheless valuable on both poets, for the general reader or beginning undergraduate more than for the advanced student or specialist. A useful addition to undergraduate collections. J. N. Igo Jr. San Antonio College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

M. Lynn Weiss is assistant professor of English and African American literature at Washington University.

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