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Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer [electronic resource].

By: Pugh, Tison.
Material type: TextTextSeries: New Perspectives on Medieval Literature: Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2013Description: 1 online resource (273 p.).ISBN: 9780813048352.Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400 -- Criticism and interpretation | Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400 -- Examinations -- Study guides | Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Introduction to Geoffrey ChaucerDDC classification: 821.1 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; An Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Abbreviations; Preface: Chaucer and Genre Theory; Chronology of Chaucer's Life and Literary Connections; 1. Chaucer's Life and Times; 2. Chaucer's Literature; Dream Visions: Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, Parliament of Fowls, and Legend of Good Women; Troilus and Criseyde; Canterbury Tales; Miscellaneous Verse and a Treatise; 3. Chaucer's Sources and Influences; Glossary of Literary Terms and Chaucerian Themes; Pronouncing Chaucer's Middle English; Word List of Chaucer's Middle English
Plot Outlines of Troilus and Criseyde and the Canterbury Tales by Line NumberNotes; Selected Readings; Index
Summary: Geoffrey Chaucer is widely considered the father of English literature. This introduction begins with a review of his life and the cultural milieu of fourteenth-century England and then expands into analyses of such major works as The Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyde, and, of course, the Canterbury Tales, examining them alongside a selection of lesser known verses.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR1924 .P84 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1207187 Available EBL1207187

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; An Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Abbreviations; Preface: Chaucer and Genre Theory; Chronology of Chaucer's Life and Literary Connections; 1. Chaucer's Life and Times; 2. Chaucer's Literature; Dream Visions: Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, Parliament of Fowls, and Legend of Good Women; Troilus and Criseyde; Canterbury Tales; Miscellaneous Verse and a Treatise; 3. Chaucer's Sources and Influences; Glossary of Literary Terms and Chaucerian Themes; Pronouncing Chaucer's Middle English; Word List of Chaucer's Middle English

Plot Outlines of Troilus and Criseyde and the Canterbury Tales by Line NumberNotes; Selected Readings; Index

Geoffrey Chaucer is widely considered the father of English literature. This introduction begins with a review of his life and the cultural milieu of fourteenth-century England and then expands into analyses of such major works as The Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyde, and, of course, the Canterbury Tales, examining them alongside a selection of lesser known verses.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This introductory overview of 14th-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer's life, culture, works, and language offers novice readers of Chaucer a means of familiarizing themselves with these key areas before undertaking study of the texts themselves. Pugh (Univ. of Central Florida) follows the template of the press's "New Perspectives on Medieval Literature: Authors and Traditions" series (which Pugh coedits with R. Barton Palmer) in combining biography, oeuvre, and contexts. To this end, three chapters are offered: "Chaucer's Life and Times," "Chaucer's Literature," and "Chaucer's Sources and Influences." An appendix provides instruction on pronouncing and reading Chaucer's Middle English, with additional notes, selected readings, and glossary. Pugh states that his primary goal is to facilitate the first-time reader's familiarity with Middle English. Secondary goals are to help students benefit from discussions of theme and contexts, via genre theory; to demonstrate the intellectual depth of Chaucer's world; and to spark readers' interest in both that world and Chaucer's place within it. Like numerous other introductory works on Chaucer, this book assists readers in a partial, yet stimulating, way; its original contribution is to cover Chaucer's entire corpus, rather than subsets based on genre or popularity. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through graduate students; general readers. C. S. Cox University of Pittsburgh

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