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Transformations of Memory and Forgetting in Sixteenth-Century France : Marguerite de Navarre, Pierre de Ronsard, Michel de Montaigne

By: Russell, Nicolas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Newark : University of Delaware Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (165 p.).ISBN: 9781611490558.Subject(s): French literature -- 16th century -- History and criticism | Marguerite, -- Queen, consort of Henry II, King of Navarre, -- 1492-1549 -- Criticism and interpretation | Memory in literature | Montaigne, Michel de, -- 1533-1592 -- Criticism and interpretation | Ronsard, Pierre de, -- 1524-1585 -- Criticism and interpretationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Transformations of Memory and Forgetting in Sixteenth-Century France : Marguerite de Navarre, Pierre de Ronsard, Michel de MontaigneDDC classification: 840.9353 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
TRANSFORMATIONS OF MEMORY AND FORGETTING IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE -- Contents -- Introduction -- PART ONE: MARGUERITE DE NAVARRE -- 1 Remembering the Fall -- 2 The Ethics of Forgetting -- PART TWO: PIERRE DE RONSARD -- 3 Mnemosyne and Lethe -- PART THREE: MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE -- 4 Paper Memory -- 5 Remnants of the Past -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author
Summary: This book proposes that in a number of French Renaissance texts, we observe a shift in thinking about memory and forgetting. Focusing on a corpus of texts by Marguerite de Navarre, Pierre de Ronsard and Michel de Montaigne, it explores several parallel transformations of and challenges to classical and medieval discourses on memory.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PQ239 .R87 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1365263 Available EBL1365263

TRANSFORMATIONS OF MEMORY AND FORGETTING IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE -- Contents -- Introduction -- PART ONE: MARGUERITE DE NAVARRE -- 1 Remembering the Fall -- 2 The Ethics of Forgetting -- PART TWO: PIERRE DE RONSARD -- 3 Mnemosyne and Lethe -- PART THREE: MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE -- 4 Paper Memory -- 5 Remnants of the Past -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author

This book proposes that in a number of French Renaissance texts, we observe a shift in thinking about memory and forgetting. Focusing on a corpus of texts by Marguerite de Navarre, Pierre de Ronsard and Michel de Montaigne, it explores several parallel transformations of and challenges to classical and medieval discourses on memory.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Examining in close detail how the mental faculty of memory was understood in Renaissance France, Russell (Colby College) neatly demonstrates the ways in which understanding this faculty in this period was no longer identical to medieval conceptions of memory and yet still different from 20th-century and contemporary conceptions of it. He argues that although 16th-century understanding of memory as a mental faculty shows continuity with certain notions dating to ancient Greece and Rome, this period of transition produced some important innovations--and these innovations are his focus. Russell's primary sources are the works of the three canonical writers mentioned in the book's subtitle. He builds his argument from a close examination of the applications of terms related to memory and forgetting, both metaphorical and more literal, solidly supporting his study with references to other scholarly works. The footnotes and bibliography are extensive, the writing style is clear, and the argument well organized. Even readers less familiar with French Renaissance literature should have no trouble following his discussion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. D. L. Boudreau Mercyhurst College

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