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Escape from New York : The New Negro Renaissance beyond Harlem

By: Baldwin, Davarian L.
Contributor(s): Makalani, Minkah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (455 p.).ISBN: 9780816688067.Subject(s): American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American literature --Illinois --Chicago -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Escape from New York : The New Negro Renaissance beyond HarlemDDC classification: 810.9 | 810.9/896073077311 LOC classification: PS285.C47Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Foreword; Introduction: New Negroes Forging a New World; I. THE DIASPORIC OUTLOOK; 1. "Brightest Africa" in the New Negro Imagination; 2. Cuban Negrismo, Mexican Indigenismo: Contesting Neocolonialism in the New Negro Movement; 3. An International African Opinion: Amy Ashwood Garvey and C. L. R. James in Black Radical London; II. NEW (NEGRO) FRONTIERS; 4. The New Negro's Brown Brother: Black American and Filipino Boxers and the "Rising Tide of Color"; 5. The New Negro of the Pacific: How African Americans Forged Solidarity with Japan
6. "A Small Man in Big Spaces": The New Negro, the Mestizo, and Jean Toomer's SouthwestIII. THE GARVEY MOVEMENT; 7. Making New Negroes in Cuba: Garveyism as a Transcultural Movement; 8. Reconfiguring the Roots and Routes of New Negro Activism: The Garvey Movement in New Orleans; IV. ENGENDERING THE EXPERIENCE; 9. Black Modernist Women at the Parisian Crossroads; 10. A Mobilized Diaspora: The First World War and Black Soldiers as New Negroes; 11. Climbing the Hilltop: In Search of a New Negro Womanhood at Howard University; 12. New Negro Marriages and the Everyday Challenges of Upward Mobility
V. CONSUMER CULTURE13. "You Just Can't Keep the Music Unless You Move with It": The Great Migration and the Black Cultural Politics of Jazz in New Orleans and Chicago; 14. New Negroes at the Beach: At Work and Play outside the Black Metropolis; VI. HOME TO HARLEM; 15. "Home to Harlem" Again: Claude McKay and the Masculine Imaginary of Black Community; 16. Not Just a World Problem: Segregation, Police Brutality, and New Negro Politics in New York City; VII. SPEAKEASY: REFLECTING ON THE NEW NEW NEGRO STUDIES; 17. The Conjunctural Field of New Negro Studies
18. Underground to Harlem: Rumblings and Clickety-Clacks of Diaspora19. The Gendering of Place in the Great Escape; Acknowledgments; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: In this volume, the Harlem Renaissance "escapes from New York" into its proper global context, recovering the broader New Negro experience as social movements, popular cultures, and public behavior spanned the globe. Highlighting how New Negroes and their allies already lived, the book stresses the need for scholarship to catch up with the historical reality of the New Negro experience.
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Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
PS283.M5 D47 2016 Ink trails II : PS283.M9A45 2009 All Our Stories Are Here : PS283.M9 A45 2009 All our stories are here : PS285.C47 Escape from New York : PS285 .C47 B66 2011 The Muse in Bronzeville : PS285.C47 H75 2013 The Genesis of the Chicago Renaissance : PS285.C47 S35 2013 Along the streets of Bronzeville :

Cover; Contents; Foreword; Introduction: New Negroes Forging a New World; I. THE DIASPORIC OUTLOOK; 1. "Brightest Africa" in the New Negro Imagination; 2. Cuban Negrismo, Mexican Indigenismo: Contesting Neocolonialism in the New Negro Movement; 3. An International African Opinion: Amy Ashwood Garvey and C. L. R. James in Black Radical London; II. NEW (NEGRO) FRONTIERS; 4. The New Negro's Brown Brother: Black American and Filipino Boxers and the "Rising Tide of Color"; 5. The New Negro of the Pacific: How African Americans Forged Solidarity with Japan

6. "A Small Man in Big Spaces": The New Negro, the Mestizo, and Jean Toomer's SouthwestIII. THE GARVEY MOVEMENT; 7. Making New Negroes in Cuba: Garveyism as a Transcultural Movement; 8. Reconfiguring the Roots and Routes of New Negro Activism: The Garvey Movement in New Orleans; IV. ENGENDERING THE EXPERIENCE; 9. Black Modernist Women at the Parisian Crossroads; 10. A Mobilized Diaspora: The First World War and Black Soldiers as New Negroes; 11. Climbing the Hilltop: In Search of a New Negro Womanhood at Howard University; 12. New Negro Marriages and the Everyday Challenges of Upward Mobility

V. CONSUMER CULTURE13. "You Just Can't Keep the Music Unless You Move with It": The Great Migration and the Black Cultural Politics of Jazz in New Orleans and Chicago; 14. New Negroes at the Beach: At Work and Play outside the Black Metropolis; VI. HOME TO HARLEM; 15. "Home to Harlem" Again: Claude McKay and the Masculine Imaginary of Black Community; 16. Not Just a World Problem: Segregation, Police Brutality, and New Negro Politics in New York City; VII. SPEAKEASY: REFLECTING ON THE NEW NEW NEGRO STUDIES; 17. The Conjunctural Field of New Negro Studies

18. Underground to Harlem: Rumblings and Clickety-Clacks of Diaspora19. The Gendering of Place in the Great Escape; Acknowledgments; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

In this volume, the Harlem Renaissance "escapes from New York" into its proper global context, recovering the broader New Negro experience as social movements, popular cultures, and public behavior spanned the globe. Highlighting how New Negroes and their allies already lived, the book stresses the need for scholarship to catch up with the historical reality of the New Negro experience.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

These 19 essays add to the growing body of Harlem Renaissance studies that seek to expand the geographical and interpretative boundaries of this event. The editors define the book's unifying theme, arguing that the Harlem Renaissance--or, as they prefer, the New Negro Renaissance--should be viewed as an international and political awakening not only of African Americans, but of non-white peoples across the globe, and that it must be recognized as a political/liberation movement as well as a signal event in African American literature and arts. The contributors represent a number of humanities disciplines and interdisciplinary fields. Many of the essays provide new ways to look at the renaissance, and all are thought provoking. The strength of the collection is its breadth--the variety of topics addressed, many of which are not usually discussed in terms of the Harlem Renaissance. The weakness is that the focus on "revolutionary" politics and international racial consciousness occasionally takes readers some distance from the Harlem Renaissance, and to political links that cannot be sustained. Still, serious scholars of 20th-century African American studies should not ignore this book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. D. Wintz Texas Southern University

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