Contemporary Arab-American Literature : Transnational Reconfigurations of Citizenship and Belonging

By: Fadda-Conrey, CarolMaterial type: TextTextSeries: American Literatures Initiative: Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (257 p.)ISBN: 9781479819027Subject(s): Alienation (Social psychology) in literature | American literature -- Arab American authors -- History and criticism | Arab Americans in literature | Arab countries -- In literature | Arabs in literature | Homeland in literature | Identity (Psychology) in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Contemporary Arab-American Literature : Transnational Reconfigurations of Citizenship and BelongingDDC classification: 810.9/8927 | 810.98927 LOC classification: PS153.A73 F34 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Transnational Arab-American Belonging; 1 Reimagining the Ancestral Arab Homeland; 2 To the Arab Homeland and Back: Narratives of Returns and Rearrivals; 3 Translocal Connections between the US and the Arab World; 4 Representing Arabs and Muslims in the US after 9/11: Gender, Religion, and Citizenship; Conclusion: Transnational Solidarity and the Arab Uprisings; Notes; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; W; Z; About the Author
Summary: The last couple of decades have witnessed a flourishing of Arab-American literature across multiple genres. Yet, increased interest in this literature is ironically paralleled by a prevalent bias against Arabs and Muslims that portrays their long presence in the US as a recent and unwelcome phenomenon. Spanning the 1990s to the present, Carol Fadda-Conrey takes in the sweep of literary and cultural texts by Arab-American writers in order to understand the ways in which their depictions of Arab homelands, whether actual or imagined, play a crucial role in shaping cultural articulations of US citizenship and belonging. By asserting themselves within a US framework while maintaining connections to their homelands, Arab-Americans contest the blanket representations of themselves as dictated by the US nation-state. Deploying a multidisciplinary framework at the intersection of Middle-Eastern studies, US ethnic studies, and diaspora studies, Fadda-Conrey argues for a transnational discourse that overturns the often rigid affiliations embedded in ethnic labels. Tracing the shifts in transnational perspectives, from the founders of Arab-American literature, like Gibran Kahlil Gibran and Ameen Rihani, to modern writers such as Naomi Shihab Nye, Joseph Geha, Randa Jarrar, and Suheir Hammad, Fadda-Conrey finds that contemporary Arab-American writers depict strong yet complex attachments to the US landscape. She explores how the idea of home is negotiated between immigrant parents and subsequent generations, alongside analyses of texts that work toward fostering more nuanced understandings of Arab and Muslim identities in the wake of post-9/11 anti-Arab sentiments.
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PS153.A73 F34 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1695992 Available EBL1695992

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Transnational Arab-American Belonging; 1 Reimagining the Ancestral Arab Homeland; 2 To the Arab Homeland and Back: Narratives of Returns and Rearrivals; 3 Translocal Connections between the US and the Arab World; 4 Representing Arabs and Muslims in the US after 9/11: Gender, Religion, and Citizenship; Conclusion: Transnational Solidarity and the Arab Uprisings; Notes; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; W; Z; About the Author

The last couple of decades have witnessed a flourishing of Arab-American literature across multiple genres. Yet, increased interest in this literature is ironically paralleled by a prevalent bias against Arabs and Muslims that portrays their long presence in the US as a recent and unwelcome phenomenon. Spanning the 1990s to the present, Carol Fadda-Conrey takes in the sweep of literary and cultural texts by Arab-American writers in order to understand the ways in which their depictions of Arab homelands, whether actual or imagined, play a crucial role in shaping cultural articulations of US citizenship and belonging. By asserting themselves within a US framework while maintaining connections to their homelands, Arab-Americans contest the blanket representations of themselves as dictated by the US nation-state. Deploying a multidisciplinary framework at the intersection of Middle-Eastern studies, US ethnic studies, and diaspora studies, Fadda-Conrey argues for a transnational discourse that overturns the often rigid affiliations embedded in ethnic labels. Tracing the shifts in transnational perspectives, from the founders of Arab-American literature, like Gibran Kahlil Gibran and Ameen Rihani, to modern writers such as Naomi Shihab Nye, Joseph Geha, Randa Jarrar, and Suheir Hammad, Fadda-Conrey finds that contemporary Arab-American writers depict strong yet complex attachments to the US landscape. She explores how the idea of home is negotiated between immigrant parents and subsequent generations, alongside analyses of texts that work toward fostering more nuanced understandings of Arab and Muslim identities in the wake of post-9/11 anti-Arab sentiments.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Fadda-ConreyCarol:

Carol Fadda-Conrey is Assistant Professor of English at Syracuse University.

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