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Nature crime : how we're getting conservation wrong / Rosaleen Duffy.

By: Duffy, Rosaleen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource ([xiii], 258 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300154351; 0300154356.Subject(s): Nature conservation -- Social aspects | Nature conservation -- Political aspects | Wild animal trade | Human ecology | Environmental responsibility | Nature -- Effect of human beings on | Endangered species | Ecotourism | Wildlife crimesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Nature crime.DDC classification: 333.95/416 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- The international wildlife trade -- Global action, local costs -- Wildlife wars : poaching and anti-poaching -- Rhino horn, ivory and the trade ban controversy -- Guerillas to gorillas : blood diamonds and coltan -- Tourist saviours -- Conclusion.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: "The perilous state of endangered species such as tigers and rhinos, and the worldwide illegal trade in ivory, diamonds, bushmeat and many other rare and valuable commodities, are familiar issues in the West. The heroes in these narratives are those who work to create protected areas for wildlife; the villains the shadowy poachers and smugglers who destroy endangered animals and their habitats for the sake of profit. In this groundbreaking book, Rosaleen Duffy argues that the story is much more complex than this. She analyses the workings of the black-market wildlife industry, pointing out that illegal trading is often the direct result of Western consumer desires, from coltan for mobile phones to caviar for the global elite. She looks at how tourists contribute, often unwittingly, to the destruction of natural environments. Most strikingly, she argues that the imperatives of Western-style conservation often result in serious injustice to local people, who are at risk of losing not only heir land but sometimes even their lives. The result of many years of first-hand research, this book is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the complex realities of nature conservation."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QH75 .D838 2010 (Browse shelf) http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vkt2w Available ocn794003573

Includes bibliographical references (pages 243-251) and index.

"The perilous state of endangered species such as tigers and rhinos, and the worldwide illegal trade in ivory, diamonds, bushmeat and many other rare and valuable commodities, are familiar issues in the West. The heroes in these narratives are those who work to create protected areas for wildlife; the villains the shadowy poachers and smugglers who destroy endangered animals and their habitats for the sake of profit. In this groundbreaking book, Rosaleen Duffy argues that the story is much more complex than this. She analyses the workings of the black-market wildlife industry, pointing out that illegal trading is often the direct result of Western consumer desires, from coltan for mobile phones to caviar for the global elite. She looks at how tourists contribute, often unwittingly, to the destruction of natural environments. Most strikingly, she argues that the imperatives of Western-style conservation often result in serious injustice to local people, who are at risk of losing not only heir land but sometimes even their lives. The result of many years of first-hand research, this book is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the complex realities of nature conservation."--Jacket.

Introduction -- The international wildlife trade -- Global action, local costs -- Wildlife wars : poaching and anti-poaching -- Rhino horn, ivory and the trade ban controversy -- Guerillas to gorillas : blood diamonds and coltan -- Tourist saviours -- Conclusion.

Print version record.

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Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this heavily researched work, Duffy (Center for International Politics, Manchester Univ., UK) draws on 15 years of personal experience, interviews, and fieldwork to provide an intriguing, informative examination of the often-overlooked complexities that encompass conservation efforts. She pulls readers from simple "good versus evil" conceptions and paints a broader picture that reveals the many issues involved, and why some efforts have had little success. Through several studies, she demonstrates how "wealthy" lifestyle preferences contribute to the decimation of wildlife habitats and continue to promote illegal trade. She examines the hostilities that arise between local communities and conservationists and why poaching and the black market remain so prevalent. Duffy also exposes consumption as the key problem that many scientists overlook and why current practices of enforcement and regulation are counterproductive. Although repetitious, the points made are well constructed and contain examples that will open readers' minds to new perspectives on conservation. This is a must read for conservationists, as it firmly demonstrates how the field is tied to several interconnected issues and adds more to the debate on determining truly good and sustainable conservation methods that will benefit all--people, animals, and habitats. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels of readership. K. K. Goldbeck Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Rosaleen Duffy is Professor at the Centre for International Politics, Manchester University, UK

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