Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Long commentary on the De anima of Aristotle / Averroes (Ibn Rushd) of Cordoba ; translated and with introduction and notes by Richard C. Taylor ; with Thérèse-Anne Druart, subeditor.

By: Averroës, 1126-1198.
Contributor(s): Taylor, Richard C, 1950- | Druart, Therese-Anne.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Yale library of medieval philosophy: Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2009]Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (cix, 498 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300164794; 0300164793.Uniform titles: Commentarium magnum in Aristotelis De anima libros. English Subject(s): Aristotle. De animaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Long commentary on the De anima of AristotleDDC classification: 128 Other classification: 5,1 | CE 1915 | CE 1917 | EN 2830 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Born in 1126 to a family of Maliki legal scholars, Ibn Rushd, known as Averroes, enjoyed a long career in religious jurisprudence at Seville and Cordoba while at the same time advancing his philosophical studies of the works of Aristotle. This translation of Averroes' Long Commentary on Aristotle's De Anima brings to English-language readers the complete text of this influential work of medieval philosophy. Richard C. Taylor provides rich notes on the Long Commentary and a generous introduction that discusses Averroes' most mature reflections on Aristotle's teachings as well as Averroes' comprehensive philosophical views on soul and intellect. It is only in the Long Commentary that Averroes finally resolves to his satisfaction the much vexed issue of the nature of intellect, Taylor shows."--Publisher's website.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
B415 .A95513 2009 (Browse shelf) http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vm33c Available ocn884499495

"This is a translation of [F. Stuart] Crawford's edition of the medieval Latin text presumed to have been rendered from Arabic into Latin by Michael Scot perhaps around 1220"--Page cvii.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 443-469) and indexes.

"Born in 1126 to a family of Maliki legal scholars, Ibn Rushd, known as Averroes, enjoyed a long career in religious jurisprudence at Seville and Cordoba while at the same time advancing his philosophical studies of the works of Aristotle. This translation of Averroes' Long Commentary on Aristotle's De Anima brings to English-language readers the complete text of this influential work of medieval philosophy. Richard C. Taylor provides rich notes on the Long Commentary and a generous introduction that discusses Averroes' most mature reflections on Aristotle's teachings as well as Averroes' comprehensive philosophical views on soul and intellect. It is only in the Long Commentary that Averroes finally resolves to his satisfaction the much vexed issue of the nature of intellect, Taylor shows."--Publisher's website.

Translated from the Arabic.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Averroes is the name in the West of Abu al-Walid Muhammed ibn-Ahmad ibn-Rushd al-Qurtubi, an influential Muslim thinker who integrated Islamic tradition with Greek philosophy. Born in Cordoba, Spain, and educated in Muslim religious, medical, and philosophical studies, he became the chief judge of Cordoba and later personal physician to two caliphs. He wrote a series of summaries and commentaries on Aristotle, Plato's Republic, as well as attacks on Avicenna's view of existence. Western Christian philosophers drew inspiration from his interpretation of Aristotle, especially his assertion that reason and philosophy are superior to faith and knowledge founded on faith. <p> Averroes died in Marrakesh, Morocco. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.