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Gender and Race in Antebellum Popular Culture.

By: Roth, Sarah N.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (332 p.).ISBN: 9781316008836.Subject(s): African American men -- Public opinion -- History -- 19th century | African American men in literature | African Americans in popular culture -- History -- 19th century | Masculinity in literature | Popular culture -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Race in literature | Slavery in literature | United States -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Women, White -- United States -- Attitudes -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gender and Race in Antebellum Popular CultureDDC classification: 305.800973 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title page; Copyright information; Table of contents; List of tables; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 "The Old Child and the Young One"; 2 "More Terrible Than the Uncaged Hyena"; 3 "How a Slave Was Made a Man"; 4 "Patient Sufferer, Gentle Martyr"; 5 Impotent Rebels, Heroes, and Martyrs; 6 "An Intrepid, Dauntless Heroine"; 7 "We Have Struck for Our Freedom"; 8 "Victory!"; Epilogue; Bibliography; Secondary Sources; Primary Sources; Index
Summary: Argues that white women, as creators and consumers of popular culture media, played a pivotal role in the demasculinization of black men during the antebellum period.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.625 .R68 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1701904 Available EBL1701904

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half-title; Title page; Copyright information; Table of contents; List of tables; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 "The Old Child and the Young One"; 2 "More Terrible Than the Uncaged Hyena"; 3 "How a Slave Was Made a Man"; 4 "Patient Sufferer, Gentle Martyr"; 5 Impotent Rebels, Heroes, and Martyrs; 6 "An Intrepid, Dauntless Heroine"; 7 "We Have Struck for Our Freedom"; 8 "Victory!"; Epilogue; Bibliography; Secondary Sources; Primary Sources; Index

Argues that white women, as creators and consumers of popular culture media, played a pivotal role in the demasculinization of black men during the antebellum period.

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