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Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House Women.

By: Stephens, Autumn.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Cleis Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (216 p.).ISBN: 9781573446044.Subject(s): Presidents - United States | Presidents -- United States -- Biography -- Anecdotes | Presidents - United States - Family | Presidents -- United States -- Family -- Anecdotes | Presidents'' spouses - United States | Presidents'' spouses -- United States -- Biography -- Anecdotes | Washington (D.C.) - Social life and customs | White House (Washington, D.C.) | Women - United States | Women -- United States -- Biography -- AnecdotesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House WomenDDC classification: 973.09 | 973.09/9 | 973.099 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
I: Revolutionary First Ladies (and A Few Spirited Friends) Forge the Way; II: Queen Victoria's Quirky American Contemporaries; III: From War to War: A Rising Feminist Uproar; IV: Affairs of State in the Fifties and Sixties; V: Beltway Babes Do Their Own Liberated Thing; VI: Tough Cookies, Half-Baked Critiques, and Much Late-Twentieth-Century Ado about Nada; VII: And So It Goes; Bibliography
Summary: First ladies are supposed to be dignified background figures, quietly supportive of their husbands'' agendas. Above all, they''re not supposed to act out or cause even a whiff of scandal. Of course, reality often overrides conventional wisdom, and this book shows how far from the prim ideal many of the Presidents'' wives have strayed. Part irreverent portrait gallery, part exuberant expose, Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House Women introduces a remarkable array of wild women, from Martha Washington, who opposed her own husband''s presidential election; to Abraham Lincoln''s eccentric wife, Mary; to rebellious daughters like Patti Davis who were the tabloid fodder of their day. Laugh-out-loud funny and filled with amazing stranger-than-fiction facts from our American history, Feisty First Ladies journeys into the realm of the eclectic sisterhood whose outrageous words and deeds have rocked the fusty old foundations of the White House — and the nation!
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I: Revolutionary First Ladies (and A Few Spirited Friends) Forge the Way; II: Queen Victoria's Quirky American Contemporaries; III: From War to War: A Rising Feminist Uproar; IV: Affairs of State in the Fifties and Sixties; V: Beltway Babes Do Their Own Liberated Thing; VI: Tough Cookies, Half-Baked Critiques, and Much Late-Twentieth-Century Ado about Nada; VII: And So It Goes; Bibliography

First ladies are supposed to be dignified background figures, quietly supportive of their husbands'' agendas. Above all, they''re not supposed to act out or cause even a whiff of scandal. Of course, reality often overrides conventional wisdom, and this book shows how far from the prim ideal many of the Presidents'' wives have strayed. Part irreverent portrait gallery, part exuberant expose, Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House Women introduces a remarkable array of wild women, from Martha Washington, who opposed her own husband''s presidential election; to Abraham Lincoln''s eccentric wife, Mary; to rebellious daughters like Patti Davis who were the tabloid fodder of their day. Laugh-out-loud funny and filled with amazing stranger-than-fiction facts from our American history, Feisty First Ladies journeys into the realm of the eclectic sisterhood whose outrageous words and deeds have rocked the fusty old foundations of the White House — and the nation!

Author notes provided by Syndetics

AUTUMN STEPHENS is the author of the bestselling and groundbreaking Wild Women series. She runs a very popular writing workshop series in the Bay Area and has been featured in Glamour , the San Francisco Chronicle , and the New York Times .

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