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Expat : Women''s True Tales of Life Abroad

By: Henry de Tessan, Christina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Adventura Books: Publisher: New York : Seal Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (362 p.).ISBN: 9781580055208.Subject(s): Americans - Foreign countries - Anecdotes | Anecdotes | Voyages and travels | Voyages and travels - Anecdotes | Women travelers | Women travelers - AnecdotesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Expat : Women''s True Tales of Life AbroadDDC classification: 910.4082 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Dedication; Introduction; Before and After Mexico; A Taste of Home; The Liverpool School of Dream and Pun; The Long Conversation; Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackboard; Jean-Claude Van Damn That Was a Good Movie!; A Mediterranean Thanksgiving, Take Two; When the Skinheads Start to Grow Hair, It's Time to Leave Town; Watching Them Grow Up; Wasabi Was the Bitter Herb; Making a Stir-Fry in Eastern Europe; Muddy Waters in Borneo; Never-Never; First, the Blanket; Beautiful New World; Saudades; In Search of Zorba; Living the Dream in Paris
Conversation in DenmarkBest Friends and Balaclavas; Growing Season; Kashmar; About the Contributors; About the Editor
Summary: It''s one thing to travel abroad—to stay in charming hotels and deliberate over whether to visit this museum or relax at that café, even to head off the beaten track for a glimpse of "real" life—and another thing altogether to move to another country. Expat chronicles the experiences of twenty-two ordinary women living extraordinary lives in outposts as far flung as Borneo, Ukraine, India, Greece, Brazil, China and the Czech Republic.In vivid detail, these writers share how the realities of life abroad match up to the expat fantasy. One woman negotiates the rough courtesies of Serbia, finding lives limned by harshness and an insurmountable spirit. Another is tutored on English manners by an eclectic bunch from Liverpool: "The cardinal sin in America is to be insincere, whereas the cardinal sin in England is to be boring." For some, their new home prompts them to reconnect or confront lost parts of themselves: One woman rediscovers her Judaism—in Japan; another writer''s Western outlook is challenged by Javanese mysticism. Many share their own naïve blunders and private confessions: a Thanksgiving dinner that doesn''t translate in Paris, a sudden yearning for bad Hollywood films. And all discover that what it means to be "American" is redefined, again and again.Expat taps into the bewilderment, the joys and surprises of life overseas, where the challenges often take unexpected forms and the obstacles overcome are all the more triumphant. Featuring an astonishing range of perspectives, destinations and circumstances, this collection offers a beautiful portrait of expatriate life.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
G465.E96 2 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1098403 Available EBL1098403

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Dedication; Introduction; Before and After Mexico; A Taste of Home; The Liverpool School of Dream and Pun; The Long Conversation; Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackboard; Jean-Claude Van Damn That Was a Good Movie!; A Mediterranean Thanksgiving, Take Two; When the Skinheads Start to Grow Hair, It's Time to Leave Town; Watching Them Grow Up; Wasabi Was the Bitter Herb; Making a Stir-Fry in Eastern Europe; Muddy Waters in Borneo; Never-Never; First, the Blanket; Beautiful New World; Saudades; In Search of Zorba; Living the Dream in Paris

Conversation in DenmarkBest Friends and Balaclavas; Growing Season; Kashmar; About the Contributors; About the Editor

It''s one thing to travel abroad—to stay in charming hotels and deliberate over whether to visit this museum or relax at that café, even to head off the beaten track for a glimpse of "real" life—and another thing altogether to move to another country. Expat chronicles the experiences of twenty-two ordinary women living extraordinary lives in outposts as far flung as Borneo, Ukraine, India, Greece, Brazil, China and the Czech Republic.In vivid detail, these writers share how the realities of life abroad match up to the expat fantasy. One woman negotiates the rough courtesies of Serbia, finding lives limned by harshness and an insurmountable spirit. Another is tutored on English manners by an eclectic bunch from Liverpool: "The cardinal sin in America is to be insincere, whereas the cardinal sin in England is to be boring." For some, their new home prompts them to reconnect or confront lost parts of themselves: One woman rediscovers her Judaism—in Japan; another writer''s Western outlook is challenged by Javanese mysticism. Many share their own naïve blunders and private confessions: a Thanksgiving dinner that doesn''t translate in Paris, a sudden yearning for bad Hollywood films. And all discover that what it means to be "American" is redefined, again and again.Expat taps into the bewilderment, the joys and surprises of life overseas, where the challenges often take unexpected forms and the obstacles overcome are all the more triumphant. Featuring an astonishing range of perspectives, destinations and circumstances, this collection offers a beautiful portrait of expatriate life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Tourists merely visit, but expatriates get to live in another culture. Some of the women represented in this collection of 22 "tales" have lived abroad as students, teachers, or aid workers, while others either pursued career opportunities or fulfilled a romantic fascination with a particular country or culture. Motivation aside, almost all have chosen to relate experiences of vulnerability and unease and a nostalgia for the culturally familiar. An expat living in appliance-deprived China recounts her craving for and courageous attempt at roasting a chicken, while another in Prague relates the challenge of finding fresh produce in order to cook a chicken stir-fry. Yet another, in the south of France, homesick for Thanksgiving turkey, describes the troubles she had concocting such a dinner for acquaintances. Others are disheartened to discover that not all Australians have an abiding love for Yanks, that not everyone in Greece, Borneo, or Japan speaks English, and that most cultures have distinctive cues or codes that the foreigner will inevitably misinterpret. Most of the reporting is of disillusionment and cultural dissonance-cautionary tales for all who believe the global village is America. Recommended for public libraries.-Lonnie Weatherby, McGill Univ. Lib., Montreal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christina Henry de Tessan has worked in publishing in San Francisco and Seattle and as a freelance translator, editor, and book reviewer in Paris. She recently coedited A Woman Alone: Travel Tales from Around the Globe . She lives on an island outside of Seattle.

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