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A Nation Can Rise No Higher Than Its Women : African American Muslim Women in the Movement for Black Self Determination, 1950-1975

By: Jeffries, Bayyinah S.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lanham : Lexington Books, 2014Description: 1 online resource (201 p.).ISBN: 9780739176542.Subject(s): African American women -- United States -- Social conditions | Black Muslims -- Social conditions | Muslim women -- United States -- Social conditions | Nation of Islam (Chicago, Ill.) -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Nation Can Rise No Higher Than Its Women : African American Muslim Women in the Movement for Black Self Determination, 1950–1975DDC classification: 320.558 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Upon the Education of Its People Rests the Fate of a Nation; 2 African American Muslim Women in the Nation of Islam Movement; 3 "Raising Her Voice"; 4 African American Activism; 5 Crossing Borders; Selected Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: A Nation Can Rise No Higher Than Its Women: African American Muslim Women in the Nation of Islam, 1950-1975 challenges traditional interpretations of African American women who joined the Original Nation of Islam during the Civil Right-Black Power era. Using a wealth of academic research and firsthand accounts, Jeffries thoroughly debunks the popular opinion that women were not influential in the Nation of Islam, revealing instead that they were heralded in the movement. Women provided a clear, and often sought after voice in the advancement of not only the Nation, but the rise of Black pride and self-awareness during one of the most important periods of Black history in the United States.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.61 .J44 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1672943 Available EBL1672943

Description based upon print version of record.

Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Upon the Education of Its People Rests the Fate of a Nation; 2 African American Muslim Women in the Nation of Islam Movement; 3 "Raising Her Voice"; 4 African American Activism; 5 Crossing Borders; Selected Bibliography; Index; About the Author

A Nation Can Rise No Higher Than Its Women: African American Muslim Women in the Nation of Islam, 1950-1975 challenges traditional interpretations of African American women who joined the Original Nation of Islam during the Civil Right-Black Power era. Using a wealth of academic research and firsthand accounts, Jeffries thoroughly debunks the popular opinion that women were not influential in the Nation of Islam, revealing instead that they were heralded in the movement. Women provided a clear, and often sought after voice in the advancement of not only the Nation, but the rise of Black pride and self-awareness during one of the most important periods of Black history in the United States.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Jeffries's account provides fascinating insight into the experiences of African American Muslim women and their contributions to the Nation of Islam. In this much-needed treatment of a little-studied subject, the author reveals much about not only the women themselves, but also the broader communities of which they were a part. Using an array of published sources and oral histories, Jeffries (Eastern Washington Univ.) explores women's motivations for joining the nation, how they crafted their identities, and the various ways in which they embraced the movement for self-determination. She pays particular attention to women's contributions in the realm of education as well as to the role that their writings played in challenging white models of beauty, diet, and public welfare. The book also highlights the transnational dimensions of these activities and includes a short case study on Bermuda. While interesting, additional examples or justification of this choice would have strengthened this part of the book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Undergraduate collections and above. --Laura Micheletti Puaca, Christopher Newport University

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