The Clubwomen''s Daughters : Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl''s Fiction, 1890-1940

By: Tarbox, GwenMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Studies in American Popular History and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (249 p.)ISBN: 9781317776031Subject(s): Children''s stories, American -- History and criticism | Clubs in literature | Collectivism -- United States -- History | Community life in literature | Feminism and literature -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Feminist fiction -- History and criticism | Girls -- Books and reading -- United States | Girls in literature | Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Progressivism in literature | Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women authors, American -- Political and social views | Young adult fiction, American -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Clubwomen''s Daughters : Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl''s Fiction, 1890-1940DDC classification: 813.40992827 | 813/.40992827 LOC classification: PS374.G55 T37 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1. Braving "Sarcasm and Sneers": The Development of the American Clubwomen's Movement; Chapter 2. "The Power to Set Things Going": The Rise of the Collectivist Impulse in American Girls' Fiction; Chapter 3. "Impersonating Their Citizen Brothers": The College Heroine's Rehearsal for Public Life; Chapter 4. Four Girls at Cottage City: Spiritual Collectivism in Emma Dunham Kelley-Hawkins' Fiction for African-American Girls
Chapter 5. "'Mama! Come An' See the Suffragists!'": Progressive-era Girls' Outdoor Fiction and the Public Display of the Collectivist ImpulseChapter 6. The Secret of the Girl Sleuth: The Women's Community As Focal Point in Depression-era Girls' Fiction; Chapter 7. Epilogue; Bibliography; Index
Summary: First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.G55 T37 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1679750 Available EBL1679750

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1. Braving "Sarcasm and Sneers": The Development of the American Clubwomen's Movement; Chapter 2. "The Power to Set Things Going": The Rise of the Collectivist Impulse in American Girls' Fiction; Chapter 3. "Impersonating Their Citizen Brothers": The College Heroine's Rehearsal for Public Life; Chapter 4. Four Girls at Cottage City: Spiritual Collectivism in Emma Dunham Kelley-Hawkins' Fiction for African-American Girls

Chapter 5. "'Mama! Come An' See the Suffragists!'": Progressive-era Girls' Outdoor Fiction and the Public Display of the Collectivist ImpulseChapter 6. The Secret of the Girl Sleuth: The Women's Community As Focal Point in Depression-era Girls' Fiction; Chapter 7. Epilogue; Bibliography; Index

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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CHOICE Review

In this lively, energetic analysis, Tarbox creates a persuasive argument that girls' books helped create a positive image of female collectivism. Suggesting that "specific combination of cultural, economic, and literary events intersected to produce and to perpetuate the collectivist impulse in girls' fiction," the author states that "each successive wave of Progressive-era girls' fiction, from the college novel in the 1890s to the detective novel in the 1930s, built upon its predecessor and afforded its readers with an increasingly radical view of American girlhood." Particularly intriguing is Tarbox's focus on the club-women movement in this period--her exploration of how popular girls' books helped support the movement by their emphasis on the powers of women's collectivism in a variety of different settings, from the women's college to the outdoor camp. A must-read book for those interested in children's literature, girls' culture, gender studies, and Progressive-era history, this engrossing and intelligent volume will be useful to all readers, from beginning undergraduates through faculty. It is a significant addition to the field of girls' literature studies. S. A. Inness; Miami University

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