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The Woman I Am : Southern Baptist Women''s Writings, 1906-2006

By: Maxwell, Melody.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Religion & American Culture: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (280 p.).ISBN: 9780817387631.Subject(s): Baptist women -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Christian literature -- Authorship | Southern Baptist Convention -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Woman I Am : Southern Baptist Women''s Writings, 1906-2006DDC classification: 286.132082 | 286/.132082 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. Southern Baptist Women's Writings in Context; 2. Woman's Work for Woman, 1906-1918; 3. Supporting the SBC, 1919-1945; 4. Cultivating a Christian Influence, 1946-1967; 5. Almost Unlimited Possibilities, 1968-1983; 6. Developing Spiritually in a Context of Division, 1984-2006; 7. Southern Baptist Women's Writings in Retrospect; Appendixes; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Melody Maxwell's The Woman I Am analyzes the traditional, progressive, and potential roles female Southern Baptist writers and editors portrayed for Southern Baptist women from 1906 to 2006, particularly in the area of missions.The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) represents the largest Protestant denomination in the United States, yet Southern Baptist women's voices have been underreported in studies of American religion and culture. In The Woman I Am, Melody Maxwell explores how female Southern Baptist writers and editors in the twentieth century depicted changing roles for women and responded to the tensions that arose as Southern Baptist women assumed leadership positions, especially in the areas of missions and denominational support.Given access to a century of primary sources and archival documents, Maxwell writes, as did many of her subjects, in a style that deftly combines the dispassionate eye of an observer with the multidimensional grasp of a participant. She examines magazines published by Woman's Missionary Union (WMU), an auxiliary to the SBC: Our Mission Fields (1906-1914), Royal Service (1914-1995), Contempo (1970-1995), and Missions Mosaic (1995-2006). In them, she traces how WMU writers and editors perceived, constructed, and expanded the lives of southern women.Showing ingenuity and resiliency, these writers and editors continually, though not always consciously, reshaped their ideal of Christian womanhood to better fit the new paths open to women in American culture and Southern Baptist life. Maxwell's work demonstrates that Southern Baptists have transformed their views on biblically sanctioned roles for women over a relatively short historical period.How Southern Baptist women perceive women's roles in their churches, homes, and the wider world is of central importance to readers interested in religion, society, and gender in the United States. The Woman I Am is a tour de force that makes a lasting contribution to the world's understanding of Southern Baptists and to their understanding of themselves.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BX6462.3 .M39 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1691110 Available EBL1691110

Description based upon print version of record.

Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. Southern Baptist Women's Writings in Context; 2. Woman's Work for Woman, 1906-1918; 3. Supporting the SBC, 1919-1945; 4. Cultivating a Christian Influence, 1946-1967; 5. Almost Unlimited Possibilities, 1968-1983; 6. Developing Spiritually in a Context of Division, 1984-2006; 7. Southern Baptist Women's Writings in Retrospect; Appendixes; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Melody Maxwell's The Woman I Am analyzes the traditional, progressive, and potential roles female Southern Baptist writers and editors portrayed for Southern Baptist women from 1906 to 2006, particularly in the area of missions.The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) represents the largest Protestant denomination in the United States, yet Southern Baptist women's voices have been underreported in studies of American religion and culture. In The Woman I Am, Melody Maxwell explores how female Southern Baptist writers and editors in the twentieth century depicted changing roles for women and responded to the tensions that arose as Southern Baptist women assumed leadership positions, especially in the areas of missions and denominational support.Given access to a century of primary sources and archival documents, Maxwell writes, as did many of her subjects, in a style that deftly combines the dispassionate eye of an observer with the multidimensional grasp of a participant. She examines magazines published by Woman's Missionary Union (WMU), an auxiliary to the SBC: Our Mission Fields (1906-1914), Royal Service (1914-1995), Contempo (1970-1995), and Missions Mosaic (1995-2006). In them, she traces how WMU writers and editors perceived, constructed, and expanded the lives of southern women.Showing ingenuity and resiliency, these writers and editors continually, though not always consciously, reshaped their ideal of Christian womanhood to better fit the new paths open to women in American culture and Southern Baptist life. Maxwell's work demonstrates that Southern Baptists have transformed their views on biblically sanctioned roles for women over a relatively short historical period.How Southern Baptist women perceive women's roles in their churches, homes, and the wider world is of central importance to readers interested in religion, society, and gender in the United States. The Woman I Am is a tour de force that makes a lasting contribution to the world's understanding of Southern Baptists and to their understanding of themselves.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Melody Maxwell is assistant professor of Christian Studies at Howard Payne University in Brownwood, Texas. She previously served with East Texas Baptist University and Woman's Missionary Union. Maxwell holds a PhD from the International Baptist Theological Seminary.<br>

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