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Women in Eighteenth Century Europe.

By: Hunt, Margaret.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Longman History of European Women: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (976 p.).ISBN: 9781317883883.Subject(s): Europe -- History -- 18th century | Europe -- Social conditions -- 18th century | Sex role -- Europe -- History -- 18th century | Women -- Europe -- History -- 18th century | Women -- Europe -- Social conditions -- 18th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women in Eighteenth Century EuropeDDC classification: 305.4094 | 305.4094/09033 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Plates; Acknowledgements; Publisher's Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Hierarchy and Difference; 2. Families; 3. Sexuality and Reproduction; 4. Food and Consumption; 5. Work and Money; 6. Paths of the Spirit; 7. Cultures of Women; 8. Civil Society and the State; 9. Age of Revolutions; Conclusion; Notes; Further Reading; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women?  In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and worldview - long before the various women's suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon.  This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics.  The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.The book deals with many regions and topics often under-represented in general surveys of European women, including coverage of the Balkans and both European Turkey and Anatolia, of Eastern Europe, of European colonial expansion (particularly the slave trade) and of Muslim, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish women''s history. Bringing all of Europe into the narrative of early modern women''s history challenges many received assumptions about Europe and women in past times, and provides essential background for dealing with issues of diversity in the Europe of today.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1587 .H86 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1710686 Available EBL1710686

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Plates; Acknowledgements; Publisher's Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Hierarchy and Difference; 2. Families; 3. Sexuality and Reproduction; 4. Food and Consumption; 5. Work and Money; 6. Paths of the Spirit; 7. Cultures of Women; 8. Civil Society and the State; 9. Age of Revolutions; Conclusion; Notes; Further Reading; Bibliography; Index

Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women?  In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and worldview - long before the various women's suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon.  This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics.  The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.The book deals with many regions and topics often under-represented in general surveys of European women, including coverage of the Balkans and both European Turkey and Anatolia, of Eastern Europe, of European colonial expansion (particularly the slave trade) and of Muslim, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish women''s history. Bringing all of Europe into the narrative of early modern women''s history challenges many received assumptions about Europe and women in past times, and provides essential background for dealing with issues of diversity in the Europe of today.

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