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Taking Root : Narratives of Jewish Women in Latin America

By: Agosín, Marjorie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Research in International Studies, Latin America Series: Publisher: Athens, OH : Ohio University Press, 2002Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (332 p.).ISBN: 9780896804258.Subject(s): Immigrants -- Latin America | Jewish women -- Latin America -- Biography | Jews, Latin American -- United States -- Biography | Latin America -- Emigration and immigrationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Taking Root : Narratives of Jewish Women in Latin AmericaDDC classification: 305.48/892408/0922 LOC classification: F1419 .J4Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: Latin American Jewishness: A Game with Shifting Identities; Chapter 2: A Sephardi Air; Chapter 3: What! No Yiddish?: Growing up Sephardi in Peru; Chapter 4: My Past Is Present: The Complex Identity of a German-Jewish- Venezuelan-American; Chapter 5: El Azar-Fate Put the Novel Cláper in My Hands; Chapter 6: Memories of Comings and Goings; Chapter 7: My Cuban Story; Chapter 8: Crossing Creative and Cultural Barriers; Chapter 9: Growing up Jewish in Colombia; Chapter 10: Found in Translation: On Becoming a Cuban Jewish Writer
Chapter 11: Mosiacs: The Story of Her LifeChapter 12: Shared Memories; Chapter 13: Judaism: An Essential Tool; Chapter 14: A Passion to Remember; Chapter 15: Poetry in the Clouds: A Costa Rican Journey; Chapter 16: From Toledo to the New World: A Story of Secrets; Chapter 17: Uruguay: A Story in Episodes; Chapter 18: Of Spices and Spells: From Morrocco to Buenos Aires; Chapter 19: Saint Anthony's Intervention and Other Accounts of Growing up Jewish in Mexico; Chapter 20: With All That I Am; Chapter 21: A Tale of Courage and Fortitude; Chapter 22: Too Many Names; Contributor Biographies
Summary: In Taking Root, Latin American women of Jewish descent, from Mexico to Uruguay, recall their coming of age with Sabbath candles and Hebrew prayers, Ladino songs and merengue music, Queen Esther and the Virgin of Guadalupe. Rich and poor, Sephardi and Ashkenazi, Jewish immigrant families searched for a new home and identity in predominantly Catholic societies. The essays included here examine the religious, economic, social, and political choices these families have made and continue to make as they forge Jewish identities in the New World. Marjorie Agosín has gathered narratives and testimonies that reveal the immense diversity of Latin American Jewish experience. These essays, based on first- and second-generation immigrant experience, describe differing points of view and levels of involvement in Jewish tradition. In Taking Root, Agosín presents us with a contemporary and vivid account of the Jewish experience in Latin America. Taking Root documents the sadness of exile and loss but also a fierce determination to maintain Jewish traditions. This is Jewish history but it is also part of the untold history of Brazil, Argentina, El Salvador, Ecuador, Chile, Peru, and all of Latin America.
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F1419 .J4 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1743612 Available EBL1743612

Description based upon print version of record.

Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: Latin American Jewishness: A Game with Shifting Identities; Chapter 2: A Sephardi Air; Chapter 3: What! No Yiddish?: Growing up Sephardi in Peru; Chapter 4: My Past Is Present: The Complex Identity of a German-Jewish- Venezuelan-American; Chapter 5: El Azar-Fate Put the Novel Cláper in My Hands; Chapter 6: Memories of Comings and Goings; Chapter 7: My Cuban Story; Chapter 8: Crossing Creative and Cultural Barriers; Chapter 9: Growing up Jewish in Colombia; Chapter 10: Found in Translation: On Becoming a Cuban Jewish Writer

Chapter 11: Mosiacs: The Story of Her LifeChapter 12: Shared Memories; Chapter 13: Judaism: An Essential Tool; Chapter 14: A Passion to Remember; Chapter 15: Poetry in the Clouds: A Costa Rican Journey; Chapter 16: From Toledo to the New World: A Story of Secrets; Chapter 17: Uruguay: A Story in Episodes; Chapter 18: Of Spices and Spells: From Morrocco to Buenos Aires; Chapter 19: Saint Anthony's Intervention and Other Accounts of Growing up Jewish in Mexico; Chapter 20: With All That I Am; Chapter 21: A Tale of Courage and Fortitude; Chapter 22: Too Many Names; Contributor Biographies

In Taking Root, Latin American women of Jewish descent, from Mexico to Uruguay, recall their coming of age with Sabbath candles and Hebrew prayers, Ladino songs and merengue music, Queen Esther and the Virgin of Guadalupe. Rich and poor, Sephardi and Ashkenazi, Jewish immigrant families searched for a new home and identity in predominantly Catholic societies. The essays included here examine the religious, economic, social, and political choices these families have made and continue to make as they forge Jewish identities in the New World. Marjorie Agosín has gathered narratives and testimonies that reveal the immense diversity of Latin American Jewish experience. These essays, based on first- and second-generation immigrant experience, describe differing points of view and levels of involvement in Jewish tradition. In Taking Root, Agosín presents us with a contemporary and vivid account of the Jewish experience in Latin America. Taking Root documents the sadness of exile and loss but also a fierce determination to maintain Jewish traditions. This is Jewish history but it is also part of the untold history of Brazil, Argentina, El Salvador, Ecuador, Chile, Peru, and all of Latin America.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

These narratives by 22 highly educated Jewish women, most of whom failed to take root in Latin America, show an astonishing variety of experience within the context of multiple migrations. Many of the writers, who considered themselves "rooted" in the Latin country where they grew up, were forced to emigrate due to political or economic circumstance. Even those who remained inherited an understanding of the experience of migration through their parents and grandparents. From this experience arises a sense of multiple identities, of having lived several lives, the before and after of migrating from one's homeland. Born into secular families, the narrators do not claim to have been affected by antisemitism. They marvel at the enclosed communities that Jews constructed to protect themselves from the all-enveloping Catholicism of their environment. Most of these writers also report a gap dividing Sephardim (Spanish-speaking Jews) from the more numerous Ashkenazim (German and Yiddish-speakers). This collection is notable for its frank intimacy and the sketches of family migrations that recap in miniature the history of the Jewish people in the 19th and 20th centuries. While some of the essays are straightforward chronicles, a few are literary gems that merit reading on their own. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Libraries at all levels. J. L. Elkin University of Michigan

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Marjorie Agosin was born in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1955. She has written many books of poetry and fiction. Her childhood and early adolescence were spent with her Jewish family in Chile, where her family also participated in the dominant Catholic culture. The young Agosin became keenly aware of her dual identity in her country, both as a participant and as an outsider. The overthrow of Salvador Allende forced her family to immigrate to Athens, Georgia, where she was then ostracized as an emigrant. <p> She is a professor of Spanish at Wellesley College. The poet's current residence is in New England. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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