Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Everyday Violence in Britain, 1850-1950 : Gender and Class

By: D''Cruze, Shani.
Contributor(s): Crewe, Ivor.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women And Men In History: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (440 p.).ISBN: 9781317875574.Subject(s): Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Violence -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Violence -- Great Britain -- History --19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Everyday Violence in Britain, 1850-1950 : Gender and ClassDDC classification: 303.6/0941/09034 | 303.6094109034 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; CONTENTS; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Foreword; Introduction: Unguarded passions: violence, history and the everyday; PART I THE USES OF VIOLENCE; 1. Domesticity and the problem of wifebeating in nineteenthcentury Britain: working-class culture, law and politics; 2. 'Men behaving badly'?: masculinity and the uses of violence, 1850-1900; 3. Understanding women committing newborn child murder in Victorian England; 4. Youth gangs, gender and violence, 1870-1900; PART II THE REGULATION OF VIOLENCE
5. 'Ingenuities of the female mind': legal and public perceptions of sexual violence in Victorian England, 1850-18906. 'She resisted with all her might': sexual violence against women in late nineteenth-century Manchester and the local press; 7. Women professionals and the regulation of violence in interwar Britain; 8. Exposing 'the inner life': the Women's Co-operative Guild's attitude to 'cruelty'; PART III THE REPRESENTATION OF VIOLENCE; 9. 'Only when drunk': the stereotyping of violence in England, c. 1850-1900; 10. Keeping ourselves to ourselves: violence in the Edwardian suburb
11. The trial of Madame Fahmy: Orientalism, violence, sexual perversity and the fear of miscegenation12. 'The irons of their fetters have eaten into their souls': nineteenth-century feminist strategies to get our bodies onto the political agenda; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: The diverse violence of modern Britain is hardly new. The Britain of 1850 to 1950 was similarly afflicted. The book is divided into four parts.  ''Getting Hurt'' which looks at everyday violence in the home (including a chapter on infanticide).  ''Uses and Rejections'' two chapters on the use of violence within groups of men and women outside the home (for example, violence within youth gangs, and male violence centred around pubs).  ''Going Public'' three chapters on how violence was regulated by law and the professional agencies which were set up to deal with it.  ''Perceptions and Representations'' this final section looks at how violence was written about, using both fiction and non-fiction sources.  Throughout the book the recurring themes of gender, class, continuity and change, public/private, and experience, discourses and representations are highlighted.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HN400.V5 E93 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1757021 Available EBL1757021

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; CONTENTS; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Foreword; Introduction: Unguarded passions: violence, history and the everyday; PART I THE USES OF VIOLENCE; 1. Domesticity and the problem of wifebeating in nineteenthcentury Britain: working-class culture, law and politics; 2. 'Men behaving badly'?: masculinity and the uses of violence, 1850-1900; 3. Understanding women committing newborn child murder in Victorian England; 4. Youth gangs, gender and violence, 1870-1900; PART II THE REGULATION OF VIOLENCE

5. 'Ingenuities of the female mind': legal and public perceptions of sexual violence in Victorian England, 1850-18906. 'She resisted with all her might': sexual violence against women in late nineteenth-century Manchester and the local press; 7. Women professionals and the regulation of violence in interwar Britain; 8. Exposing 'the inner life': the Women's Co-operative Guild's attitude to 'cruelty'; PART III THE REPRESENTATION OF VIOLENCE; 9. 'Only when drunk': the stereotyping of violence in England, c. 1850-1900; 10. Keeping ourselves to ourselves: violence in the Edwardian suburb

11. The trial of Madame Fahmy: Orientalism, violence, sexual perversity and the fear of miscegenation12. 'The irons of their fetters have eaten into their souls': nineteenth-century feminist strategies to get our bodies onto the political agenda; Selected Bibliography; Index

The diverse violence of modern Britain is hardly new. The Britain of 1850 to 1950 was similarly afflicted. The book is divided into four parts.  ''Getting Hurt'' which looks at everyday violence in the home (including a chapter on infanticide).  ''Uses and Rejections'' two chapters on the use of violence within groups of men and women outside the home (for example, violence within youth gangs, and male violence centred around pubs).  ''Going Public'' three chapters on how violence was regulated by law and the professional agencies which were set up to deal with it.  ''Perceptions and Representations'' this final section looks at how violence was written about, using both fiction and non-fiction sources.  Throughout the book the recurring themes of gender, class, continuity and change, public/private, and experience, discourses and representations are highlighted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Shani D'Cruze is Reader in Women's History at Manchester Metropolitan University.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.