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The Living Mirror : The Representation of Doubling Identities in the British and Polish Women''s Literature (1846-1938)

By: Naszkowska, Klara.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Frankfurt : Peter Lang GmbH, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften, 2014Description: 1 online resource (266 p.).ISBN: 9783653040258.Subject(s): English literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Feminism in literature | Identity (Philosophical concept) in literature | Polish literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Psychoanalysis in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Living Mirror : The Representation of Doubling Identities in the British and Polish Women''s Literature (1846-1938)DDC classification: 820 LOC classification: PR115 .N37 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Acknowledgements; Table of Contents; Introduction; 1. Outline of the Book; 2. Psychoanalytic Inspiration; 3. Masculine Double; PART I; Chapter I British Literature: Survey of the Main Trends; Chapter II Polish Romanticism: Madness. Vampirism. Messianism; 1. Survey of the Main Trends; 2. Romantic Femininity and Feminism; 3. Narcyza Żmichowska and (her) Enthusiasts; Chapter III Polish Positivism: A Set of Restrictions; 1. Survey of the Main Trends; 2. Maria Konopnicka: Borderline Case, Rule, Exception; Chapter IV Young Poland: Decadence and Melancholia; 1. Survey of the Main Trends
2. Zofia Nałkowska: The Great Lady of Polish Literature3. Maria Komornicka: Spirit in the Mask of Nakedness; PART II; Chapter V The Role of Mothers; 1. Mothers and Daughters: Feminine Doubling; 2. Acquisition of Feminine Sexuality; 3. To Become a Feminine Subject; Chapter VI The Role of Fathers; 1. Fear of Feminine Sexuality; 2. (No) Education; 3. Blindness, Castration, Destruction; Chapter VII Metaphors; 1. Hair, Serpents, Medusa; 2. Fire and Heat; 3. Flowers and Moon; 4. Love and Death. Eros and Thanatos; Conclusion; Select Bibliography; Primary Bibliography; Secondary Bibliography:
Summary: This book identifies a corpus of British and Polish texts that share correspondences with reference to the themes of feminine doubling, the difficulty of asserting feminine subjectivity, sexual mother-figures and symbolic father-figures. It draws on the Freudo-Lacanian psychoanalysis and the French feminist uses of it known as ecriture feminine - the theories of Luce Irigaray and Helene Cixous. It also introduces the theories of the forgotten Russian-Jewish psychoanalyst, Sabina Spielrein. The first part of the book takes account of specifics of Polish culture and history that made women writers marginalised within this context. In the second part, it closely and comparatively examines the selected British and Polish texts, while giving voice to the unknown, stereotyped, or forgotten Polish works. The innovative features of the book include its comparative character and the implementation of various psychoanalytical approaches to the Polish texts. Also, to my knowledge, this is the first critical work to analyse literature with the use of the ideas of Sabina Spielrein.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR115 .N37 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1766407 Available EBL1766407

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Acknowledgements; Table of Contents; Introduction; 1. Outline of the Book; 2. Psychoanalytic Inspiration; 3. Masculine Double; PART I; Chapter I British Literature: Survey of the Main Trends; Chapter II Polish Romanticism: Madness. Vampirism. Messianism; 1. Survey of the Main Trends; 2. Romantic Femininity and Feminism; 3. Narcyza Żmichowska and (her) Enthusiasts; Chapter III Polish Positivism: A Set of Restrictions; 1. Survey of the Main Trends; 2. Maria Konopnicka: Borderline Case, Rule, Exception; Chapter IV Young Poland: Decadence and Melancholia; 1. Survey of the Main Trends

2. Zofia Nałkowska: The Great Lady of Polish Literature3. Maria Komornicka: Spirit in the Mask of Nakedness; PART II; Chapter V The Role of Mothers; 1. Mothers and Daughters: Feminine Doubling; 2. Acquisition of Feminine Sexuality; 3. To Become a Feminine Subject; Chapter VI The Role of Fathers; 1. Fear of Feminine Sexuality; 2. (No) Education; 3. Blindness, Castration, Destruction; Chapter VII Metaphors; 1. Hair, Serpents, Medusa; 2. Fire and Heat; 3. Flowers and Moon; 4. Love and Death. Eros and Thanatos; Conclusion; Select Bibliography; Primary Bibliography; Secondary Bibliography:

This book identifies a corpus of British and Polish texts that share correspondences with reference to the themes of feminine doubling, the difficulty of asserting feminine subjectivity, sexual mother-figures and symbolic father-figures. It draws on the Freudo-Lacanian psychoanalysis and the French feminist uses of it known as ecriture feminine - the theories of Luce Irigaray and Helene Cixous. It also introduces the theories of the forgotten Russian-Jewish psychoanalyst, Sabina Spielrein. The first part of the book takes account of specifics of Polish culture and history that made women writers marginalised within this context. In the second part, it closely and comparatively examines the selected British and Polish texts, while giving voice to the unknown, stereotyped, or forgotten Polish works. The innovative features of the book include its comparative character and the implementation of various psychoanalytical approaches to the Polish texts. Also, to my knowledge, this is the first critical work to analyse literature with the use of the ideas of Sabina Spielrein.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Klara Naszkowska completed her PhD in Comparative Literature at the University of Edinburgh and holds MA in Polish Philology from the University of Warsaw. Her research interests lie in the area of psychoanalysis, 19th century women's prose and feminist critique. She has published in academic journals and collective books in Poland and abroad.

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