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Black Women and White Women in the Professions : Occupational Segregation by Race and Gender, 1960-1980

By: Sokoloff, Natalie J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Perspectives on Gender: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (344 p.).ISBN: 9781317960904.Subject(s): African American women in the professions | Discrimination in employment -- United States | Professional employees -- United States | Women in the professionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black Women and White Women in the Professions : Occupational Segregation by Race and Gender, 1960-1980DDC classification: 331.4/133/0973 | 331.41330973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: The Half-Full Glass: Partial Integration in the Professions; Introduction; The Parameters of the Study; Just What are the Professions?; The Changing Occupational Landscape; The Need for a Structural Approach; Controversy and Interpretation; Inroads and Interpretation; Methodological Note; Conclusion; Chapter 2: The Professions; Structural Change and Group Access; Introduction; Increased Growth in the Professions: Has it Benefited all Groups?
An Introduction to the Detailed ProfessionsGrowth and Change for the Four Race/Gender Groups; Conclusion; Chapter 3: "Gains" and "Losses" For Black and White Men and Women in the Professions; Introduction; Uncovering the Degree of Race/Gender Segregation; The Need for a Proportional Index of Change; Conclusion; Chapter 4: White Men: The More Things Change, the More they Stay the Same; Introduction; Numerical Increases and Growth Rates; Index of Representation for the 30 Large Professions/Technical Fields; Conclusion; Chapter 5: Black Men: Affirmative Action or Reaction?; Introduction
The Growth of Black Men in the ProfessionsA Comparison of Black Men and White Men; An Intermediate-Level Analysis Using the Index of Relative Advantage: A Comparison of Black Men and White Men; A Deeper Look into the Detailed Professions/Technical Fields; Conclusion; Chapter 6: White Women: Movement and Change; Introduction; Changes from 1960 to 1980: Numbers and Percentages; A Comparison with White Men; A Comparison with Black Men; Conclusion; Chapter 7: Black Women: Beyond the Myth of Double Advantage; Introduction; The Interacton of Race and Gender
A Profile of Black Women in the Professions, 1960-1980Black Women and White Men: The Index of Relative Advantage; Black Women and Black Men: The Index of Relative Advantage; Black Women and White Women: The Index of Relative Advantage; Conclusion; Chapter 8: The Half-Empty Glass: Can it Ever be Filled?; Twenty Years of Change: A Summary of What Happened in the Professions 1960-1980; Racial and Gender Segregation, 1980 to the Present; The Paradox of Partial Change; Toward the Future; Building Coalitions for Change; Appendix 1: Methodology
Making 1960, 1970, and 1980 Census Categories ComparableDifferences in Occupational Codes Across the Three Census Decades; Standardizing to 1970 Occupational Categories; How the Four Race/Gender Groups were Recalculated for 1960 and 1980 Censuses to Make Use of the 1970 Occupational Categories; Correction Factor for Nonresponse Cases; Correction Factor for Undercount of Race/Gender Groups in the Experienced Civilian Labor Force; Appendix 2: Detailed Occupational Census Categories for Professions and Technical Fields; Notes; References; Index
Summary: First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6054.2.U6 S65 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1594961 Available EBL1594961

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: The Half-Full Glass: Partial Integration in the Professions; Introduction; The Parameters of the Study; Just What are the Professions?; The Changing Occupational Landscape; The Need for a Structural Approach; Controversy and Interpretation; Inroads and Interpretation; Methodological Note; Conclusion; Chapter 2: The Professions; Structural Change and Group Access; Introduction; Increased Growth in the Professions: Has it Benefited all Groups?

An Introduction to the Detailed ProfessionsGrowth and Change for the Four Race/Gender Groups; Conclusion; Chapter 3: "Gains" and "Losses" For Black and White Men and Women in the Professions; Introduction; Uncovering the Degree of Race/Gender Segregation; The Need for a Proportional Index of Change; Conclusion; Chapter 4: White Men: The More Things Change, the More they Stay the Same; Introduction; Numerical Increases and Growth Rates; Index of Representation for the 30 Large Professions/Technical Fields; Conclusion; Chapter 5: Black Men: Affirmative Action or Reaction?; Introduction

The Growth of Black Men in the ProfessionsA Comparison of Black Men and White Men; An Intermediate-Level Analysis Using the Index of Relative Advantage: A Comparison of Black Men and White Men; A Deeper Look into the Detailed Professions/Technical Fields; Conclusion; Chapter 6: White Women: Movement and Change; Introduction; Changes from 1960 to 1980: Numbers and Percentages; A Comparison with White Men; A Comparison with Black Men; Conclusion; Chapter 7: Black Women: Beyond the Myth of Double Advantage; Introduction; The Interacton of Race and Gender

A Profile of Black Women in the Professions, 1960-1980Black Women and White Men: The Index of Relative Advantage; Black Women and Black Men: The Index of Relative Advantage; Black Women and White Women: The Index of Relative Advantage; Conclusion; Chapter 8: The Half-Empty Glass: Can it Ever be Filled?; Twenty Years of Change: A Summary of What Happened in the Professions 1960-1980; Racial and Gender Segregation, 1980 to the Present; The Paradox of Partial Change; Toward the Future; Building Coalitions for Change; Appendix 1: Methodology

Making 1960, 1970, and 1980 Census Categories ComparableDifferences in Occupational Codes Across the Three Census Decades; Standardizing to 1970 Occupational Categories; How the Four Race/Gender Groups were Recalculated for 1960 and 1980 Censuses to Make Use of the 1970 Occupational Categories; Correction Factor for Nonresponse Cases; Correction Factor for Undercount of Race/Gender Groups in the Experienced Civilian Labor Force; Appendix 2: Detailed Occupational Census Categories for Professions and Technical Fields; Notes; References; Index

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Sokoloff's carefully researched book explodes numerous myths about women and minorities displacing white men in the professions. She examines government data (1960-80) and concludes that although women and nonwhite men did gain greater access to professional/technical positions, white men maintained their dominance in the most desired professions. White women made some gains further down the ladder in professions, such as accounting, once dominated by white males; black men and women made lesser gains in the same areas. Some professions became integrated by gender and racial group, but most of the 30 professional/technical arenas studied did not. Some professional groups, such as physicians, grew so fast that the number of black/female professionals did increase, although usually in less well paid subsectors. White male representation grew faster, however, so white men had an even greater dominance of these fields by 1980. White men have not been displaced in most professions but have continued to be the overwhelming majority in the most desirable occupations. The "twofer" myth about black women is refuted: black women have not gained parity with black (or white) men in the professions. Given 1980s myths about white men being displaced by female/minority workers, this book's well-documented refutations are a breath of fresh air. General; advanced undergraduate through professional. J. R. Feagin; University of Florida

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