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Lessons Learned and Not Yet Learned from a Multicountry Initiative on Women''s Economic Empowerment.

By: Johansson de Silva, Sara.
Contributor(s): Paci, Pierella | Posadas, Josefina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Washington : World Bank Publications, 2014Description: 1 online resource (83 p.).ISBN: 9781464800702.Subject(s): Entrepreneurs | Women -- Economic conditions | Women -- EmploymentGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Lessons Learned and Not Yet Learned from a Multicountry Initiative on Women''s Economic EmpowermentDDC classification: 305.42 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; About the Authors; Abbreviations; Executive Summary; Background; Lessons on Impact; Tables; Table ES.1 Five Results-Based Initiatives: Objectives and Approaches; Lessons on Pilot Interventions; Note; Chapter 1 Background; Why Focusing on Women's Economic Empowerment and Why Using Pilots?; Boxes; Box 1.1 When Is an Intervention a "Pilot"?; The Nuts and Bolts of the RBI Pilots; Table 1.1 T he Result-Based Initiatives: Objectives, Approach, and Outcomes; Table 1.2 Commonalities and Differences in Design, Implementation, and Impact Evaluation
Table 1.3 Impact Evaluation MethodsTable 1.4 E xamples of Female Economic Empowerment Questions; Notes; Chapter 2 What We Have Learned about RBI Intervention Impacts and What We Could Have Learned, But Did Not; Table 2.1 Impacts on Economic Opportunities; Table 2.2 Impacts on Human Capital Endowments and Resources; Table 2.3 Impacts on Agency; Economic Opportunities; Box 2.1 Key Findings on the Impact of the Interventions; Human Capital Endowments and Assets; Agency; Note; Chapter 3 Lessons Learned on Pilot Design, Implementation, and Evaluation; Risks at the Design Stage
Box 3.1 Key Requirements for Successful Pilot ImplementationTable 3.1 Number of Beneficiaries; Table 3.2 Project Delays; Issues Surrounding Impact Evaluation Methodology; Box 3.2 Guidelines for Designing IE Pilots; Table 3.3 Budget and Time Constraints versus Quality of Impact Evaluation; Table 3.4 Female Economic Empowerment Indicators; Table 3.5 Observations in Treatment and Control Groups; Table 3.6 Intervention and Data Collection Levels; The Importance of Monitoring; Figure
Figure 3.1 Alternative Policy Recommendations When Control Group Comparisons Find No Statistical Significant ImpactsNotes; Chapter 4 Conclusions; Appendix A Country Case Study Summaries; Box A.1 The World Bank's Gender Equity Model; Appendix B Technical Concepts in Impact Evaluation Design; Appendix C Power Calculations for Mekong RBI; Bibliography
Summary: The Results-Based Initiatives (RBI), launched in 2007, were a pioneering attempt to provide comprehensive, coherent, and rigorous evidence on effective interventions to foster the economic empowerment of women. The RBI comprised five small pilots with built-in impact evaluation designed to identify what works best in promoting better outcomes for women as entrepreneurs, wage earners or farmers, under different country contexts. The program was an innovative experiment in an important policy area. While there is a clear rationale for policy interventions to help remove constraints to women's economic empowerment, knowledge of what interventions work best in different settings remains limited. When the RBI were conceived, rigorous evidence in this area was close to nonexistent because no systematic impact evaluations had been carried out in developing countries. However, the RBI fell short of meeting several of their ambitious objectives. This study highlights lessons from the RBI with respect to both the impact of the interventions and dos and don'ts in the design and implementation of pilots. Regarding the impact on economic opportunities, the interventions did not generally increase women's earnings, with the exception of the Peru pilot. However, women who received training generally appreciated the access to new information and felt their skills and their involvement in business associations and networks had increased. However, it would be wrong to conclude that these interventions were not effective. The lack of robust positive impact may be due to the evaluations being conducted too soon to show fully the long-term effects of the interventions, or to problems in the design, implementation, or measurement of pilot outcomes. In particular, there was a clear need of an "early warning system" to synchronize the corrections in the interventions with the design of the impact evaluation. The RBI were overambitious regarding what could be achieved with a limited budget and a short time frame.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1381 .J553 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1595471 Available EBL1595471

Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; About the Authors; Abbreviations; Executive Summary; Background; Lessons on Impact; Tables; Table ES.1 Five Results-Based Initiatives: Objectives and Approaches; Lessons on Pilot Interventions; Note; Chapter 1 Background; Why Focusing on Women's Economic Empowerment and Why Using Pilots?; Boxes; Box 1.1 When Is an Intervention a "Pilot"?; The Nuts and Bolts of the RBI Pilots; Table 1.1 T he Result-Based Initiatives: Objectives, Approach, and Outcomes; Table 1.2 Commonalities and Differences in Design, Implementation, and Impact Evaluation

Table 1.3 Impact Evaluation MethodsTable 1.4 E xamples of Female Economic Empowerment Questions; Notes; Chapter 2 What We Have Learned about RBI Intervention Impacts and What We Could Have Learned, But Did Not; Table 2.1 Impacts on Economic Opportunities; Table 2.2 Impacts on Human Capital Endowments and Resources; Table 2.3 Impacts on Agency; Economic Opportunities; Box 2.1 Key Findings on the Impact of the Interventions; Human Capital Endowments and Assets; Agency; Note; Chapter 3 Lessons Learned on Pilot Design, Implementation, and Evaluation; Risks at the Design Stage

Box 3.1 Key Requirements for Successful Pilot ImplementationTable 3.1 Number of Beneficiaries; Table 3.2 Project Delays; Issues Surrounding Impact Evaluation Methodology; Box 3.2 Guidelines for Designing IE Pilots; Table 3.3 Budget and Time Constraints versus Quality of Impact Evaluation; Table 3.4 Female Economic Empowerment Indicators; Table 3.5 Observations in Treatment and Control Groups; Table 3.6 Intervention and Data Collection Levels; The Importance of Monitoring; Figure

Figure 3.1 Alternative Policy Recommendations When Control Group Comparisons Find No Statistical Significant ImpactsNotes; Chapter 4 Conclusions; Appendix A Country Case Study Summaries; Box A.1 The World Bank's Gender Equity Model; Appendix B Technical Concepts in Impact Evaluation Design; Appendix C Power Calculations for Mekong RBI; Bibliography

The Results-Based Initiatives (RBI), launched in 2007, were a pioneering attempt to provide comprehensive, coherent, and rigorous evidence on effective interventions to foster the economic empowerment of women. The RBI comprised five small pilots with built-in impact evaluation designed to identify what works best in promoting better outcomes for women as entrepreneurs, wage earners or farmers, under different country contexts. The program was an innovative experiment in an important policy area. While there is a clear rationale for policy interventions to help remove constraints to women's economic empowerment, knowledge of what interventions work best in different settings remains limited. When the RBI were conceived, rigorous evidence in this area was close to nonexistent because no systematic impact evaluations had been carried out in developing countries. However, the RBI fell short of meeting several of their ambitious objectives. This study highlights lessons from the RBI with respect to both the impact of the interventions and dos and don'ts in the design and implementation of pilots. Regarding the impact on economic opportunities, the interventions did not generally increase women's earnings, with the exception of the Peru pilot. However, women who received training generally appreciated the access to new information and felt their skills and their involvement in business associations and networks had increased. However, it would be wrong to conclude that these interventions were not effective. The lack of robust positive impact may be due to the evaluations being conducted too soon to show fully the long-term effects of the interventions, or to problems in the design, implementation, or measurement of pilot outcomes. In particular, there was a clear need of an "early warning system" to synchronize the corrections in the interventions with the design of the impact evaluation. The RBI were overambitious regarding what could be achieved with a limited budget and a short time frame.

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