Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Death, Men, and Modernism : Trauma and Narrative in British Fiction from Hardy to Woolf

By: Freedman, Ariela.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Literary Criticism and Cultural Theory: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (166 p.).ISBN: 9781135383725.Subject(s): Death in literature | English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | English fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Men in literature | Modernism (Literature) -- Great Britain | Narration (Rhetoric) -- History -- 19th century | Narration (Rhetoric) -- History -- 20th century | Psychic trauma in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Death, Men, and Modernism : Trauma and Narrative in British Fiction from Hardy to WoolfDDC classification: 823.009/3548 | 823.0093548 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Self-Spectre: Haunted Narrative in Jude the Obscure; Chapter 2: E. M. Forster and the Gender of Dying; Chapter 3: Death Watch: Lawrence, Ford, and Freud; Chapter 4: After the Party: Woolf, Mansfield, and World War I; Chapter 5: Gifts, Goods, and Gods: H. D., Freud, and Trauma; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Death, Men and Modernism argues that the figure of the dead man becomes a locus of attention and a symptom of crisis in British writing of the early to mid-twentieth century. While Victorian writers used dying women to dramatize aesthetic, structural, and historical concerns, modernist novelists turned to the figure of the dying man to exemplify concerns about both masculinity and modernity. Along with their representations of death, these novelists developed new narrative techniques to make the trauma they depicted palpable. Contrary to modernist genealogies, the emergence of the figure of the dead man in texts as early as Thomas Hardy''s Jude the Obscure suggests that World War I intensified-but did not cause-these anxieties. This book elaborates a nodal point which links death, masculinity, and modernity long before the events of World War I.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR888.D37 F74 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1666952 Available EBL1666952

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Self-Spectre: Haunted Narrative in Jude the Obscure; Chapter 2: E. M. Forster and the Gender of Dying; Chapter 3: Death Watch: Lawrence, Ford, and Freud; Chapter 4: After the Party: Woolf, Mansfield, and World War I; Chapter 5: Gifts, Goods, and Gods: H. D., Freud, and Trauma; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Death, Men and Modernism argues that the figure of the dead man becomes a locus of attention and a symptom of crisis in British writing of the early to mid-twentieth century. While Victorian writers used dying women to dramatize aesthetic, structural, and historical concerns, modernist novelists turned to the figure of the dying man to exemplify concerns about both masculinity and modernity. Along with their representations of death, these novelists developed new narrative techniques to make the trauma they depicted palpable. Contrary to modernist genealogies, the emergence of the figure of the dead man in texts as early as Thomas Hardy''s Jude the Obscure suggests that World War I intensified-but did not cause-these anxieties. This book elaborates a nodal point which links death, masculinity, and modernity long before the events of World War I.

Description based upon print version of record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.