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Beyond Babar : The European Tradition in Children''s Literature

By: Beckett, Sandra L.
Contributor(s): Nikolajeva, Maria.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : Scarecrow Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (338 p.).ISBN: 9781461656791.Subject(s): Children''s literature, European - History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beyond Babar : The European Tradition in Children''s LiteratureDDC classification: 809.89282094 LOC classification: PN1009.A1 | B435 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Introduction; 1: Earth Hanging in Infinity: Janusz Korczak''s King Matt the First; 2: The Taming of the Two: Antoine de Saint-Exupery''s Little Prince; 3: A Misunderstood Tragedy: Astrid Lindgren''s Pippi Longstocking Books; 4: Creating the Eternal Farewell: Tove Jansson''s Moomin Novels; 5: Blue Train, Red Flag, Rainbow World: Gianni Rodari''s The Befana''s Toyshop; 6: Modernism for Children? Cecil Bødker''s Silas and the Black Mare; 7: Michel Tournier Retells the Robinson Crusoe Myth: Friday and Robinson: Life on Speranza Island
8: About a Factory-Made Boy: Christine Nöstlinger''s Story about Conrad9: A Neverending Success Story? Michael Ende''s Return Trip to Fantastica; 10: "We Were a Pair": Peter Pohl''s Johnny, My Friend; 11: Philosophical Homework or Universal Amazement? Jostein Gaarder''s Sophie''s World; 12: What do we Translate when we Translate Children''s Literature?; Bibliography; Index; About the Contributors
Summary: Beyond Babar: The European Tradition in Children''s Literature examines in depth eleven of the most celebrated European children''s novels in substantial, critical essays written by well-known international scholars. This approach provides a comprehensive discussion of the selected works from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Each essay offers a critical introduction to the text that can serve as a point of departure for literary scholars, professors of children''s literature, primary and secondary school teachers, and librarians who are interested in texts that cross languages and cultures.
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Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Introduction; 1: Earth Hanging in Infinity: Janusz Korczak''s King Matt the First; 2: The Taming of the Two: Antoine de Saint-Exupery''s Little Prince; 3: A Misunderstood Tragedy: Astrid Lindgren''s Pippi Longstocking Books; 4: Creating the Eternal Farewell: Tove Jansson''s Moomin Novels; 5: Blue Train, Red Flag, Rainbow World: Gianni Rodari''s The Befana''s Toyshop; 6: Modernism for Children? Cecil Bødker''s Silas and the Black Mare; 7: Michel Tournier Retells the Robinson Crusoe Myth: Friday and Robinson: Life on Speranza Island

8: About a Factory-Made Boy: Christine Nöstlinger''s Story about Conrad9: A Neverending Success Story? Michael Ende''s Return Trip to Fantastica; 10: "We Were a Pair": Peter Pohl''s Johnny, My Friend; 11: Philosophical Homework or Universal Amazement? Jostein Gaarder''s Sophie''s World; 12: What do we Translate when we Translate Children''s Literature?; Bibliography; Index; About the Contributors

Beyond Babar: The European Tradition in Children''s Literature examines in depth eleven of the most celebrated European children''s novels in substantial, critical essays written by well-known international scholars. This approach provides a comprehensive discussion of the selected works from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Each essay offers a critical introduction to the text that can serve as a point of departure for literary scholars, professors of children''s literature, primary and secondary school teachers, and librarians who are interested in texts that cross languages and cultures.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

In the late '80s, the Children's Literature Association, a group of academicians and scholars, published three volumes of essays concerning titles proposed as a literary canon in children's literature. Except for the recognized classics Heidi and Pinocchio, the books considered in Perry Nodelman's Touchstones: Reflections on the Best in Children's Literature (1985-'89) were all written in English. This new title is intended to complement Touchstones by presenting essays on outstanding works of European children's literature that have been translated into English. The articles cover books familiar to most American librarians: Astrid Lindgren's "Pippi Longstocking" books (grievously mistranslated, according to Nikolajeva); Tove Jansson's Moomintroll stories; Saint-Exup?ry's The Little Prince; and Michael Ende's The Neverending Story. Other titles that may be less familiar are introduced by scholarly advocates: Janusz Korczak's King Matt the First, Gianni Rodari's The Befana's Toyshop, Jostein Gaarder's Sophie's World, and others. Nikolajeva's illuminating essay on translation of children's books is alone worth the price. While this collection is aimed at a scholarly audience, it is also essential background reading for librarians and teachers who seek to promote international understanding through children's books.-Margaret A. Chang, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Two decades ago the Children's Literature Association published Touchstones: Reflections on the Best in Children's Literature, ed. by Perry Nodelman (3 vols., 1985-89), which helped establish a children's lit "canon." Unfortunately, volumes focused on literature written in English, due in large part to translation issues. Beckett (Brock Univ., Canada) and Nikolajeva (Stockholm Univ., Sweden) intend the present volume to complement Touchstones and broaden scholarly conversations to international works. Countries represented in these 12 essays are Poland, France, Sweden, Italy, Denmark, Austria, Germany, and Norway; novels discussed were chosen for their "excellence, importance, distinctiveness, and popularity." Even when presenting such classics as Tove Jannsson's Moomintroll books and Michael Ende's The Neverending Story, scholars focus on how the traditional is subverted. Claire Malarte-Feldman brings impressive cultural, historical, and social context to a discussion of Antoine de Saint-Exupery's familiar yet mysterious Little Prince. Nikolajeva contributes two excellent essays, both centered on issues of translation. In the first, she repositions Astrid Lindgren's comedic Pippi Longstocking books as "tragedy," primarily the result of translation issues (Pippi's wordplay is toned down or misunderstood); in the second she discusses myriad translation complications, concluding that "an appropriate translation strategy must naturally be taken in each individual case." ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. J. Brothers Lincoln Land Community College

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