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Woman President : Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture

By: Sheeler, Kristina Horn.
Contributor(s): Anderson, Karrin Vasby.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Presidential Rhetoric and Political Communication: Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (258 p.).ISBN: 9781623490102.Subject(s): Clinton, Hillary Rodham | Feminism and mass media -- United States | Gender mainstreaming -- United States | Mass media and women -- United States | Palin, Sarah, 1964- | Presidents -- United States -- Election -- Case studies | Sex discrimination against women -- United States | Women presidential candidates -- United States | Women presidents -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Woman President : Confronting Postfeminist Political CultureDDC classification: 306.2082 | 306.20820973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The First Shall Be Last: The "Pioneer" Frame as a Constraint for Women Presidential Candidates; 2. Fictional Presidentiality: Presidential Portrayals on the Large and Small Screens; 3. Presidential Campaign Oratory: Two Faces of Feminism; 4. Political Journalism and Punditry: Framing the "Dangerous" Campaigns of Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton; 5. Bodies Politic: "Pouring" the Presidential Body; 6. Parodying Presidentiality: A (Not So) Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the White House; Conclusion: Our Candidates, Ourselves; Notes
BibliographyIndex
Summary: What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining-and thus, the electing-of a woman as president? Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women.Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates-one that is expressed in both political and popular culture.In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson provide a discussion of US presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women's historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody.
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Title Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The First Shall Be Last: The "Pioneer" Frame as a Constraint for Women Presidential Candidates; 2. Fictional Presidentiality: Presidential Portrayals on the Large and Small Screens; 3. Presidential Campaign Oratory: Two Faces of Feminism; 4. Political Journalism and Punditry: Framing the "Dangerous" Campaigns of Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton; 5. Bodies Politic: "Pouring" the Presidential Body; 6. Parodying Presidentiality: A (Not So) Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the White House; Conclusion: Our Candidates, Ourselves; Notes

BibliographyIndex

What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining-and thus, the electing-of a woman as president? Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women.Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates-one that is expressed in both political and popular culture.In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson provide a discussion of US presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women's historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody.

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"A pernicious backlash" expressed in political as well as popular culture increases the difficulty of electing a woman to the nation's top job. Arguing that Americans have always preferred potential female presidential candidates to actual female presidential candidates, Sheeler (Indiana Univ. Purdue Univ.) and Anderson (Colorado State Univ.) note that although the first woman ran for president in 1872 (before women had won the right to vote through ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment), Americans still find it difficult to imagine a woman as president and therefore are less likely to elect a woman. Studying Hillary Clinton's campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, Sarah Palin's campaign as the first female Republican vice presidential nominee, and other modern campaigns by women running for the nation's top office, the authors conclude that women running for president or vice president face a backlash. The backlash results from a negative reaction to the political gains enjoyed by women; therefore, election of the first female president will continue to be more than merely difficult. If voters cannot imagine a woman as president of the US, will they vote for a female candidate for that office? Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. W. K. Hall Bradley University

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