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Women and Rhetoric between the Wars.

By: George, Ann.
Contributor(s): Weiser, M. Elizabeth | Zepernick, Janet.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms: Publisher: Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (322 p.).ISBN: 9780809331390.Subject(s): Feminism -- Language | Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- Language | Women in public life -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women and Rhetoric between the WarsDDC classification: 306.44/082 | 306.44082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction - Ann George, M. Elizabeth Weiser, Janet Zepernick; Voluntary Associations for the Civic Scene; 1. Continuous Mediation: Julia Grace Wales's New Rhetoric - Wendy B. Sharer; 2. The Hope for Peace and Bread - Hephzibah Roskelly; 3. Gertrude Bonnin's Transrhetorical Fight for Land Rights - Elizabeth Wilkinson; 4. A Rhetor's Apprenticeship: Reading Frances Perkins's Rhetorical Autobiography - Janet Zepernick; 5. Working Together and Being Prepared: Early Girl Scouting as Citizenship Training - Sarah Hallenbeck
Popular Celebrity in the Epideictic Scene6. Reading Helen Keller - Ann George; 7. Dorothy Day: Personalizing (to) the Masses - M. Elizabeth Weiser; 8. The Shocking Morality of Nannie Helen Burroughs - Sandra L. Robinson; 9. Bessie Smith's Blues as Rhetorical Advocacy - Coretta Pittman; 10. Traditional Form, Subversive Function: Aunt Molly Jackson's Labor Struggles - Cassandra Parente; 11. Sweethearts of the Skies - Sara Hillin; Academia and the Scene of Professionalism; 12. Field Guides: Women Writing Anthropology - Risa Applegarth
13. "Have We Not a Mind Like They?" : Jovita González on Nation and Gender - Kathy Jurado14. "Exceptional Women" : Epideictic Rhetoric and Women Scientists - Jordynn Jack; 15. "Long I Followed Happy Guides" : Activism, Advocacy, and English Studies - Kay Halasek; Works Cited; Contributors; Index; Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms; Other Books in the Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms Series; Back Cover
Summary: Normal.dotm 0 0 1 216 1232 SIU Press 10 2 1512 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false In Women and Rhetoric between the Wars, editors Ann George, M. Elizabeth Weiser, and Janet Zepernick have gathered together insightful essays from major scholars on women whose practices and theories helped shape the field of modern rhetoric. Examining the period between World War I and World War II, this volume sheds light on the forgotten rhetorical work done by the women of that time. It also goes beyond recovery to develop new methodologies for future research in the field. Collected within are analyses of familiar figures such as Jane Addams, Amelia Earhart, Helen Keller, and Bessie Smith, as well as explorations of less well known, yet nevertheless influential, women such as Zitkala-Ša, Jovita González, and Florence Sabin. Contributors evaluate the forces in the civic, entertainment, and academic scenes that influenced the rhetorical praxis of these women. Each essay presents examples of women's rhetoric that move us away from the "waves" model toward a more accurate understanding of women's multiple, diverse rhetorical interventions in public discourse. The collection thus creates a new understanding of historiography, the rise of modern rhetorical theory, and the role of women professionals after suffrage. From celebrities to scientists, suffragettes to academics, the dynamic women of this volume speak eloquently to the field of rhetoric studies today.  
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Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction - Ann George, M. Elizabeth Weiser, Janet Zepernick; Voluntary Associations for the Civic Scene; 1. Continuous Mediation: Julia Grace Wales's New Rhetoric - Wendy B. Sharer; 2. The Hope for Peace and Bread - Hephzibah Roskelly; 3. Gertrude Bonnin's Transrhetorical Fight for Land Rights - Elizabeth Wilkinson; 4. A Rhetor's Apprenticeship: Reading Frances Perkins's Rhetorical Autobiography - Janet Zepernick; 5. Working Together and Being Prepared: Early Girl Scouting as Citizenship Training - Sarah Hallenbeck

Popular Celebrity in the Epideictic Scene6. Reading Helen Keller - Ann George; 7. Dorothy Day: Personalizing (to) the Masses - M. Elizabeth Weiser; 8. The Shocking Morality of Nannie Helen Burroughs - Sandra L. Robinson; 9. Bessie Smith's Blues as Rhetorical Advocacy - Coretta Pittman; 10. Traditional Form, Subversive Function: Aunt Molly Jackson's Labor Struggles - Cassandra Parente; 11. Sweethearts of the Skies - Sara Hillin; Academia and the Scene of Professionalism; 12. Field Guides: Women Writing Anthropology - Risa Applegarth

13. "Have We Not a Mind Like They?" : Jovita González on Nation and Gender - Kathy Jurado14. "Exceptional Women" : Epideictic Rhetoric and Women Scientists - Jordynn Jack; 15. "Long I Followed Happy Guides" : Activism, Advocacy, and English Studies - Kay Halasek; Works Cited; Contributors; Index; Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms; Other Books in the Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms Series; Back Cover

Normal.dotm 0 0 1 216 1232 SIU Press 10 2 1512 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false In Women and Rhetoric between the Wars, editors Ann George, M. Elizabeth Weiser, and Janet Zepernick have gathered together insightful essays from major scholars on women whose practices and theories helped shape the field of modern rhetoric. Examining the period between World War I and World War II, this volume sheds light on the forgotten rhetorical work done by the women of that time. It also goes beyond recovery to develop new methodologies for future research in the field. Collected within are analyses of familiar figures such as Jane Addams, Amelia Earhart, Helen Keller, and Bessie Smith, as well as explorations of less well known, yet nevertheless influential, women such as Zitkala-Ša, Jovita González, and Florence Sabin. Contributors evaluate the forces in the civic, entertainment, and academic scenes that influenced the rhetorical praxis of these women. Each essay presents examples of women's rhetoric that move us away from the "waves" model toward a more accurate understanding of women's multiple, diverse rhetorical interventions in public discourse. The collection thus creates a new understanding of historiography, the rise of modern rhetorical theory, and the role of women professionals after suffrage. From celebrities to scientists, suffragettes to academics, the dynamic women of this volume speak eloquently to the field of rhetoric studies today.  

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the history of American feminism, some people often view the period between the two world wars as a gap between "first" and "second" waves--between the political achievements of the suffrage movement, on the one hand, and the social transformations of the 1960s-70s on the other. This historical erasure comes in part from "a reassertion of the purely domestic and arhetorical nature of American womanhood" during and immediately after WW II. The interwar years were in fact a remarkable moment for women's voices in public life that one risks forgetting, as the editors of this volume argue. George (Texas Christian Univ.), Weiser (Ohio State Univ.), and Zepernick (Pittsburg State Univ., Kansas) perform the important task of restoring women's rhetorical practices to scholarly attention. The contributors to the volume focus on female leadership in civic, volunteer, and educational organizations, and on little-studied rhetorical genres such as folklore and blues singing. Essayists treating popular figures such as Helen Keller and Amelia Earhart analyze how the culture of celebrity served to negate the radical critiques of gender relations suggested by their writings and achievements. This collection makes an outstanding contribution to the fields of American studies and women's rhetoric. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. L. R. Braunstein Dartmouth College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ann George is associate professor of English at Texas Christian University and coauthor of Kenneth Burke in the 1930s . <p> M. Elizabeth Weiser is an associate professor of English at The Ohio State University, the author of Burke, War, Words: Rhetoricizing Dramatism , and a coeditor of Engaging Audience: Writing in an Age of New Literacies .</p> Janet Zepernick is assistant professor of English at Pittsburg State University (Kansas) and has published work on disciplinarity and transfer in the Journal of the Council of Writing Program Administrators.

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