Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Building the Old Time Religion : Women Evangelists in the Progressive Era

By: Pope-Levison, Priscilla.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (281 p.).ISBN: 9780814744420.Subject(s): United States -- Church history -- 19th century | United States -- Church history -- 20th century | Women evangelists -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Women evangelists -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Building the Old Time Religion : Women Evangelists in the Progressive EraDDC classification: 269.20820973 LOC classification: BV3773 .P58 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Converted, Called, Commissioned: A Phalanx of Institution Builders; 1. Tents, Autos, Gospel Grenades: Evangelistic Organizations; 2. Mothers, Saints, Bishops: Churches and Denominations; 3. Biblical, Practical, Vocational: Religious Training Schools; 4. Soap, Soup, Salvation: Rescue Homes and Rescue Missions; Conclusion; Appendix: Evangelists and Institutions; Notes; Bibliography; Index of Names and Subjects; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; Index of Scripture References; About the Author
Summary: During the Progessive Era, a period of unprecedented ingenuity, women evangelists built the old time religion with brick and mortar, uniforms and automobiles, fresh converts and devoted protégés. Across America, entrepreneurial women founded churches, denominations, religious training schools, rescue homes, rescue missions, and evangelistic organizations. Until now, these intrepid women have gone largely unnoticed, though their collective yet unchoreographed decision to build institutions in the service of evangelism marked a seismic shift in American Christianity.    In this ground-breaking study, Priscilla Pope-Levison dusts off the unpublished letters, diaries, sermons, and yearbooks of these pioneers to share their personal tribulations and public achievements. The effect is staggering. With an uncanny eye for essential details and a knack for historical nuance, Pope-Levison breathes life into not just one or two of these women-but two dozen.    The evangelistic empire of Aimee Semple McPherson represents the pinnacle of this shift from itinerancy to institution building. Her name remains legendary. Yet she built her institutions on the foundation of the work of women evangelists who preceded her. Their stories-untold until now-reveal the cunning and strength of women who forged a path for every generation, including our own, to follow.   Priscilla Pope-Levison  is Professor of Theology and Assistant Director of Women's Studies at Seattle Pacific University. Her previous books include  Sex, Gender, and Christianity ;  Turn the Pulpit Loose: Two Centuries of American Women Evangelists ;  Return to Babel: Global Perspectives on the Bible ;  Jesus in Global Contexts ; and  Evangelization in a Liberation Perspective .
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Converted, Called, Commissioned: A Phalanx of Institution Builders; 1. Tents, Autos, Gospel Grenades: Evangelistic Organizations; 2. Mothers, Saints, Bishops: Churches and Denominations; 3. Biblical, Practical, Vocational: Religious Training Schools; 4. Soap, Soup, Salvation: Rescue Homes and Rescue Missions; Conclusion; Appendix: Evangelists and Institutions; Notes; Bibliography; Index of Names and Subjects; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; Index of Scripture References; About the Author

During the Progessive Era, a period of unprecedented ingenuity, women evangelists built the old time religion with brick and mortar, uniforms and automobiles, fresh converts and devoted protégés. Across America, entrepreneurial women founded churches, denominations, religious training schools, rescue homes, rescue missions, and evangelistic organizations. Until now, these intrepid women have gone largely unnoticed, though their collective yet unchoreographed decision to build institutions in the service of evangelism marked a seismic shift in American Christianity.    In this ground-breaking study, Priscilla Pope-Levison dusts off the unpublished letters, diaries, sermons, and yearbooks of these pioneers to share their personal tribulations and public achievements. The effect is staggering. With an uncanny eye for essential details and a knack for historical nuance, Pope-Levison breathes life into not just one or two of these women-but two dozen.    The evangelistic empire of Aimee Semple McPherson represents the pinnacle of this shift from itinerancy to institution building. Her name remains legendary. Yet she built her institutions on the foundation of the work of women evangelists who preceded her. Their stories-untold until now-reveal the cunning and strength of women who forged a path for every generation, including our own, to follow.   Priscilla Pope-Levison  is Professor of Theology and Assistant Director of Women's Studies at Seattle Pacific University. Her previous books include  Sex, Gender, and Christianity ;  Turn the Pulpit Loose: Two Centuries of American Women Evangelists ;  Return to Babel: Global Perspectives on the Bible ;  Jesus in Global Contexts ; and  Evangelization in a Liberation Perspective .

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pope-Levison (Seattle Pacific Univ.) looks at prominent women involved with the work of evangelism during the Progressive Era. Though this type of work would become a norm for women in Protestant churches by the mid-20th century, the stories of women who worked as evangelists during this earlier period are often not well known (if they are known at all). Pope-Levison addresses four different contexts in which these women worked: evangelistic organizations, churches and denominations, religious training schools, and rescue homes and missions. The way in which she frames the stories with prevalent conflicts in American Christianity from the period is particularly interesting. She discusses conflicts related to conversion, the nature of sanctification, and gender. Notably she lets the various stories stand as they are, discussing successes but also failures. Her aim is not to offer idealized versions of events, but to place these women into their social and historical contexts and to tell of their experiences, both good and bad. This deeply engaging book will interest audiences ranging from general readers (particularly those with an interest in women and Christianity, or Christianity during the Progressive Era) to students and scholars. It will be valuable in undergraduate or graduate classrooms. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. M. M. Veeneman North Park University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.