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Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century : Writing Between Philosophy and Literature

By: Dick, Alexander.
Contributor(s): Lupton, Christina.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Pickering & Chatto Publishers, 2008Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (325 p.).ISBN: 9781851965731.Subject(s): Geschichte 1700-1800 | Philosophy, British -- 18th century | PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century : Writing Between Philosophy and LiteratureDDC classification: 192 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Notes on Contributors; Introduction; 1. Philosophy/ Non-Philosophy and Derrida''s (Non) Relations with Eighteenth-Century Empiricism; 2. Locke''s Desire; 3. Philosophy and Politeness, Moral Autonomy and Malleability in Shaftesbury''s Characteristics; 4. Reid, Writing and the Mechanics of Common Sense; 5. Preposterous Hume; 6. Aesthetic Sensibility and the Contours of Sympathy Through Hume''s Insertions to the Treatise; 7. David Hume and Jane Austen on Pride; 8. Hume, Religion, Literary Form; 9. The Epistemology of Genre; 10. The Primitive in Adam Smith''s History; 11. Can Julie be Trusted?
12. After the Summum Bonum13. Music Vs Conscience in Wordsworth''s Poetry; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: Brings together scholars who use literary interpretation and discourse analysis to read 18th-century British philosophy in its historical context. This work analyses how the philosophers of the Enlightenment viewed their writing; and, how their institutional positions as teachers and writers influenced their understanding of human consciousness.
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Notes on Contributors; Introduction; 1. Philosophy/ Non-Philosophy and Derrida''s (Non) Relations with Eighteenth-Century Empiricism; 2. Locke''s Desire; 3. Philosophy and Politeness, Moral Autonomy and Malleability in Shaftesbury''s Characteristics; 4. Reid, Writing and the Mechanics of Common Sense; 5. Preposterous Hume; 6. Aesthetic Sensibility and the Contours of Sympathy Through Hume''s Insertions to the Treatise; 7. David Hume and Jane Austen on Pride; 8. Hume, Religion, Literary Form; 9. The Epistemology of Genre; 10. The Primitive in Adam Smith''s History; 11. Can Julie be Trusted?

12. After the Summum Bonum13. Music Vs Conscience in Wordsworth''s Poetry; Notes; Works Cited; Index

Brings together scholars who use literary interpretation and discourse analysis to read 18th-century British philosophy in its historical context. This work analyses how the philosophers of the Enlightenment viewed their writing; and, how their institutional positions as teachers and writers influenced their understanding of human consciousness.

Description based upon print version of record.

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