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Bound to Emancipate [electronic resource] : Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong Kong

By: Chin, Angelina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Asia/Pacific/Perspectives: Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2012Description: 1 online resource (303 p.).ISBN: 9781442215610.Subject(s): Feminism - China - History - 20th century | Feminism - China - Hong Kong - History - 20th century | Women - China - History - 20th century | Women - China - Hong Kong - History - 20th century | Women employees - China - History - 20th century | Women employees - China - Hong Kong - History - 20th century | Women''s rights - China - History - 20th century | Women''s rights - China - Hong Kong - History - 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bound to Emancipate : Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong KongDDC classification: 305.420951 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Notes on Transliteration; Conclusion; Glossary; Works Cited; Index; About the Author
Summary: Emancipation, a defining feature of twentieth-century Chinese society, is explored in detail in this compelling study. Angelina Chin expands and reinterprets the meaning of women's emancipation by examining what this rhetoric meant to lower-class women. Challenging the nation-based framework of history by focusing on two cities, Chin compares colonial Hong Kong with Guangzhou, which allows her to seamlessly integrate colonial studies and China studies.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=911848 Available EBL911848

Description based upon print version of record.

Contents; Acknowledgments; Notes on Transliteration; Conclusion; Glossary; Works Cited; Index; About the Author

Emancipation, a defining feature of twentieth-century Chinese society, is explored in detail in this compelling study. Angelina Chin expands and reinterprets the meaning of women's emancipation by examining what this rhetoric meant to lower-class women. Challenging the nation-based framework of history by focusing on two cities, Chin compares colonial Hong Kong with Guangzhou, which allows her to seamlessly integrate colonial studies and China studies.

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CHOICE Review

Careful attention to language marks this thoughtful study of lower-class women in 1920s and 1930s South China. Chin (Pomona College) analyzes how social commentators discussed the project of "emancipating" (jiefang) women in revolutionary Guangzhou and compares that to the discourse of protection of helpless females in British-controlled Hong Kong. A range of occupations was available to poor women, primarily in various forms of service. In Guangzhou, emancipation was expected to lead to service to the nation; women were to bind themselves to the ideals of patriotic citizenship. Service workers, however, found gaining recognition within the labor movement difficult. In Hong Kong, the colonial government sought to regulate women's roles to promote social order. The colony's Chinese elite responded with their own ideas of charity for unattached females, including the famous Po Leung Kuk (Society for the Protection of Women and Children). Chin includes a chapter of "testimony" from women admitted to the Po Leung Kuk, who were routinely interviewed by the staff. This part of the book is a helpful addition to Maria Jaschok's pioneering work Concubines and Bondservants: A Social History (CH, Sep'89, 27-0452). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. E. Stapleton State University of New York at Buffalo

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