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Women''s Figures [electronic resource] : An Illustrated Guide to the Economic Progress of Women In America

By: Furchtgott-Roth, Diana.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Lanham : AEI Press, 2012Edition: 2012.Description: 1 online resource (217 p.).ISBN: 9780844772431.Subject(s): Sex discrimination against women - United States - History - 20th century - Statistics | Sex discrimination in employment - United States - History - 20th century - Statistics | Women - United States - Economic conditions - 20th century - StatisticsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women''s Figures : An Illustrated Guide to the Economic Progress of Women In AmericaDDC classification: 305.40973 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Full Title Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; Part I; Part II; Part III; Part IV; Part V; Part VI; Part VII; Part VIII; Appendix; References; Index; About the Author; Boilerplate
Summary: The myth that women make 78 cents on a man's dollar is a standard refrain in popular media and serves as a rationale for affirmative action for women. Unstated is that for women and men with the same job and work experience, the wage gap practically disappears. In Women's Figures, Manhattan Senior Fellow Diana Furchtgott-Roth shatters the myth of the wage gap. Women are continuing to gain ground relative to men, and in some cases, they have even reversed the gender gap. Rather than helping women, preferential policies undermine America's idea of meritocracy, and call into question the value of women's hard-earned achievements.
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HQ1426 .F885 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=990644 Available EBL990644

Description based upon print version of record.

Full Title Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; Part I; Part II; Part III; Part IV; Part V; Part VI; Part VII; Part VIII; Appendix; References; Index; About the Author; Boilerplate

The myth that women make 78 cents on a man's dollar is a standard refrain in popular media and serves as a rationale for affirmative action for women. Unstated is that for women and men with the same job and work experience, the wage gap practically disappears. In Women's Figures, Manhattan Senior Fellow Diana Furchtgott-Roth shatters the myth of the wage gap. Women are continuing to gain ground relative to men, and in some cases, they have even reversed the gender gap. Rather than helping women, preferential policies undermine America's idea of meritocracy, and call into question the value of women's hard-earned achievements.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Furchtgott-Roth (Manhattan Institute for Policy Research) has fully updated the first edition of this book, originally published in 1999. She is well versed in the interpretation of labor market, education, and demographic statistics from economic policy stints under the Reagan and both Bush administrations. The statistics presented can be interpreted either as clear evidence of women's increased ability to make career and family choices freely, or as evidence of continuing discrimination against women operating in an era of constrained choice. Depending on one's point of view, this book can be seen either as a valuable counterweight to a feminist-dominated gender policy agenda, or as another conservative sally in the ongoing US class conflict. Furchtgott-Roth argues that various gender-oriented policies, including affirmative action, actually undermine women's successes. She also attacks the Obama health care initiative for undermining marriage, as its proposed health insurance subsidies will be greater per capita for single people than for married people with similar per capita incomes. A closing chapter documents the internal finances of a number of feminist organizations, albeit with no comparison figures for other lobbying or nonprofit groups. This book would be valuable in a course on critical thinking that provides counterweight from other sources. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate students and general readers. J. P. Jacobsen Wesleyan University

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