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Women and the White House [electronic resource] : Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics

By: Vaughn, Justin S.
Contributor(s): Goren, Lilly J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2012Description: 1 online resource (331 p.).ISBN: 9780813141039.Subject(s): Presidential candidates - United States | Presidents - Family relationships - United States | Women - Political actvity - United States | Women political candidates - United States | Women presidential candidates - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women and the White House : Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential PoliticsDDC classification: 323.340973 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Front cover; Copyright; Contents; 1. The Mechanized Gaze; 2. Puritan or Pit Bull; 3. Colbert Nation; 4. Soccer Moms, Hockey Moms, National Security Moms; 5. Fact or Fiction; 6. Gendering the Presidency without Gender in the Presidency ; 7. It''s a Man''s World; 8. Sitting with Oprah, Dancing with Ellen; 9. The Checkout Line Perspective; 10. Viral Videos; 11. High Cultire, Popular Culture, and the Modern First Ladies; 12. The First Family; 13. The Presidential Partnership; Acknowledgments; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index
Summary: The president of the United States traditionally serves as a symbol of power, virtue, ability, dominance, popularity, and patriarchy. In recent years, however, the high-profile candidacies of Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and Michelle Bachmann have provoked new interest in gendered popular culture and how it influences Americans'' perceptions of the country''s highest political office.In this timely volume, editors Justin S. Vaughn and Lilly J. Goren lead a team of scholars in examining how the president and the first lady exist as a function of public expectations and cultural gender roles. The authors investigate how the candidates'' messages are conveyed, altered, and interpreted in "hard" and "soft" media forums, from the nightly news to daytime talk shows, and from tabloids to the blogosphere. They also address the portrayal of the presidency in film and television productions such as Kisses for My President (1964), Air Force One (1997), and Commander in Chief (2005).With its strong, multidisciplinary approach, Women and the White House commences a wider discussion about the possibility of a female president in the United States, the ways in which popular perceptions of gender will impact her leadership, and the cultural challenges she will face.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1046258 Available EBL1046258

Description based upon print version of record.

Front cover; Copyright; Contents; 1. The Mechanized Gaze; 2. Puritan or Pit Bull; 3. Colbert Nation; 4. Soccer Moms, Hockey Moms, National Security Moms; 5. Fact or Fiction; 6. Gendering the Presidency without Gender in the Presidency ; 7. It''s a Man''s World; 8. Sitting with Oprah, Dancing with Ellen; 9. The Checkout Line Perspective; 10. Viral Videos; 11. High Cultire, Popular Culture, and the Modern First Ladies; 12. The First Family; 13. The Presidential Partnership; Acknowledgments; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index

The president of the United States traditionally serves as a symbol of power, virtue, ability, dominance, popularity, and patriarchy. In recent years, however, the high-profile candidacies of Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and Michelle Bachmann have provoked new interest in gendered popular culture and how it influences Americans'' perceptions of the country''s highest political office.In this timely volume, editors Justin S. Vaughn and Lilly J. Goren lead a team of scholars in examining how the president and the first lady exist as a function of public expectations and cultural gender roles. The authors investigate how the candidates'' messages are conveyed, altered, and interpreted in "hard" and "soft" media forums, from the nightly news to daytime talk shows, and from tabloids to the blogosphere. They also address the portrayal of the presidency in film and television productions such as Kisses for My President (1964), Air Force One (1997), and Commander in Chief (2005).With its strong, multidisciplinary approach, Women and the White House commences a wider discussion about the possibility of a female president in the United States, the ways in which popular perceptions of gender will impact her leadership, and the cultural challenges she will face.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Justin S. Vaughn is assistant professor of political science at Boise State University.</p> <p> Lilly J. Goren is professor of politics and global studies at Carroll University and the editor of You've Come a Long Way, Baby: Women, Politics, and Popular Culture .</p>

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