Reading 1759 [electronic resource] : Literary Culture in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and France

By: Regan, ShaunMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Transits: Literature, Thought & Culture, 1650–1850: Publisher: Lanham : Bucknell University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (265 p.)ISBN: 9781611484793Subject(s): Books and reading -- France -- History -- 18th century | Books and reading -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Literature and society -- France -- History -- 18th century | Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading 1759 : Literary Culture in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and FranceDDC classification: 820.9006 LOC classification: PR445Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS; INTRODUCTION; Part I. WRITING EMPIRE; Chapter 1. "WHAT MANKIND HAS LOST AND GAINED": JOHNSON, RASSELAS, AND COLONIALISM; Chapter 2. VOLTAIRE'S CANDIDE AS A GLOBAL TEXT: WAR, SLAVERY, AND LEADERSHIP; Part II. SENTIMENTAL ETHICS, LUXURIOUS SEXUALITIES; Chapter 3. ADAM SMITH'S THE THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS IN 1759: SPECTATORSHIP, DUTY, AND SOCIAL IMPROVEMENT; Chapter 4. "ON THE SOFT BEDS OF LUXURY MOST KINGDOMS HAVE EXPIRED": 1759 AND THE LIVES OF PROSTITUTES; Part III. AUTHORSHIP AND AESTHETICS
Chapter 5. YOUNG, GOLDSMITH, JOHNSON, AND THE IDEA OF THE AUTHOR IN 1759Chapter 6. TOWARDS A NEW LANGUAGE: SUBLIME AESTHETICS IN SMART'S JUBILATE AGNO; Part IV. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS DISCONTENTS; Chapter 7. THE ENCYCLOPÉDIE IN 1759: CRISIS AND CONTINUATION; Chapter 8. LOST CAUSE: HUME, CAUSATION, AND RASSELAS; Part V. ORIGINALITY AND APPROPRIATION; Chapter 9. ECCENTRICITY, ORIGINALITY, AND THE NOVEL: TRISTRAM SHANDY, VOLUMES 1 AND 2; Chapter 10. SHAKESPEARE'S "PROPRIETY" AND THE MID-EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL: SARAH FIELDING'S THE HISTORY OF THE COUNTESS OF DELLWYN
Part VI. CONCLUSION: READING 1759Chapter 11. WRITERS, REVIEWERS, AND THE CULTURE OF READING; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; CONTRIBUTORS
Summary: Reading 1759 investigates the literary culture of a remarkable year in British and French writing, and ideas. Examining key works by Johnson, Voltaire, Sterne, Adam Smith, Sarah Fielding, and Christopher Smart, the volume presents a wide-ranging account of the year's work in literature and the key issues that preoccupied writers at this time.
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PR445 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1053907 Available EBL1053907

Description based upon print version of record.

CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS; INTRODUCTION; Part I. WRITING EMPIRE; Chapter 1. "WHAT MANKIND HAS LOST AND GAINED": JOHNSON, RASSELAS, AND COLONIALISM; Chapter 2. VOLTAIRE'S CANDIDE AS A GLOBAL TEXT: WAR, SLAVERY, AND LEADERSHIP; Part II. SENTIMENTAL ETHICS, LUXURIOUS SEXUALITIES; Chapter 3. ADAM SMITH'S THE THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS IN 1759: SPECTATORSHIP, DUTY, AND SOCIAL IMPROVEMENT; Chapter 4. "ON THE SOFT BEDS OF LUXURY MOST KINGDOMS HAVE EXPIRED": 1759 AND THE LIVES OF PROSTITUTES; Part III. AUTHORSHIP AND AESTHETICS

Chapter 5. YOUNG, GOLDSMITH, JOHNSON, AND THE IDEA OF THE AUTHOR IN 1759Chapter 6. TOWARDS A NEW LANGUAGE: SUBLIME AESTHETICS IN SMART'S JUBILATE AGNO; Part IV. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS DISCONTENTS; Chapter 7. THE ENCYCLOPÉDIE IN 1759: CRISIS AND CONTINUATION; Chapter 8. LOST CAUSE: HUME, CAUSATION, AND RASSELAS; Part V. ORIGINALITY AND APPROPRIATION; Chapter 9. ECCENTRICITY, ORIGINALITY, AND THE NOVEL: TRISTRAM SHANDY, VOLUMES 1 AND 2; Chapter 10. SHAKESPEARE'S "PROPRIETY" AND THE MID-EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL: SARAH FIELDING'S THE HISTORY OF THE COUNTESS OF DELLWYN

Part VI. CONCLUSION: READING 1759Chapter 11. WRITERS, REVIEWERS, AND THE CULTURE OF READING; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; CONTRIBUTORS

Reading 1759 investigates the literary culture of a remarkable year in British and French writing, and ideas. Examining key works by Johnson, Voltaire, Sterne, Adam Smith, Sarah Fielding, and Christopher Smart, the volume presents a wide-ranging account of the year's work in literature and the key issues that preoccupied writers at this time.

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CHOICE Review

This volume offers fine essays devoted to the pivotal year 1759, a time when Britain emerged as a world power to be reckoned with and when the British literary scene exploded with a collateral force. Regan (Queen's Univ., Belfast) divides the collection into six sections, treating the literature of empire and war, sentimentality, authorship, the Enlightenment, the notion of authorial originality, and the "culture of reading." The volume treats major writers, including Samuel Johnson, Voltaire, Diderot, Adam Smith, Edward Young, Oliver Goldsmith, Christopher Smart, David Hume, Laurence Sterne, and Sarah Fielding. Despite its successes, however, the collection is unbalanced. Three essays (of eleven) focus on Johnson, largely Rasselas. (What about The Idler?) And where are Edward Burke (A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful) and Arthur Murphy (The Orphan of China)? Regan should perhaps have eschewed the French and focused exclusively on Britain. These reservations aside, Reading 1759 offers a superb, cogent introduction to mid-18th-century literary culture, covering much important ground and opening up new prospects for future investigation. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. A. W. Lee Arkansas Tech University

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