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Married Women and the Law in Premodern Northwest Europe [electronic resource].

By: Beattie, Cordelia.
Contributor(s): Stevens, Matthew Frank.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Gender in the Middle Ages: Publisher: Woodbridge : Boydell & Brewer, 2013Description: 1 online resource (262 p.).ISBN: 9781782041146.Subject(s): Marriage -- Case studies | Wives -- Case studies | Wives -- Conduct of lifeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Married Women and the Law in Premodern Northwest EuropeDDC classification: 306.8723 | 306.87230940902 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
CONTENTS; Figures and Tables ; Contributors ; Introduction: Uncovering Married Woman ; 1. Inheritance, Property and Marriage in Medieval Norway; 2. Spousal Disputes, the Marital Property System, and the Law in Later Medieval Sweden ; 3. When Two Worlds Collide: Marriage and the Law in Medieval Ireland ; 4. Married Woman, Crime and the Courts in Late Medieval Wales ; 5. Peasant Women, Agency and Status in Mid-Thirteenth- to Late Fourteenth-Century England: Some Reconsiderations ; 6. London''s Married Women, Debt Litigation and Coverture in the Court of Common Pleas
7. Married Women, Contracts and Converture in Late Medieval England 8. Property, Family and Partnership: Married Women and Legal Capability in Late Medieval Ghent ; 9. ''For His Interest''? Women, Debt and Coverture in Early Modern Scotland ; 10. The Worth of Married Women in the English Church Courts, c. 1550-1730; 11. Married Women, Work and the Law: Evidence from Early Modern Germany ; Index
Summary: Fresh approaches to how premodern women were viewed in legal terms, demonstrating how this varied from country to country and across the centuries.
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Description based upon print version of record.

CONTENTS; Figures and Tables ; Contributors ; Introduction: Uncovering Married Woman ; 1. Inheritance, Property and Marriage in Medieval Norway; 2. Spousal Disputes, the Marital Property System, and the Law in Later Medieval Sweden ; 3. When Two Worlds Collide: Marriage and the Law in Medieval Ireland ; 4. Married Woman, Crime and the Courts in Late Medieval Wales ; 5. Peasant Women, Agency and Status in Mid-Thirteenth- to Late Fourteenth-Century England: Some Reconsiderations ; 6. London''s Married Women, Debt Litigation and Coverture in the Court of Common Pleas

7. Married Women, Contracts and Converture in Late Medieval England 8. Property, Family and Partnership: Married Women and Legal Capability in Late Medieval Ghent ; 9. ''For His Interest''? Women, Debt and Coverture in Early Modern Scotland ; 10. The Worth of Married Women in the English Church Courts, c. 1550-1730; 11. Married Women, Work and the Law: Evidence from Early Modern Germany ; Index

Fresh approaches to how premodern women were viewed in legal terms, demonstrating how this varied from country to country and across the centuries.

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CHOICE Review

Beattie (Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland) and Stevens (Swansea Univ., Wales) have collected 11 interesting articles that reassess understanding of coverture. The essays examine the varied circumstances in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Ghent, Germany, Norway, and Sweden from the late 12th century up to 1800. Each author challenges the idea that coverture always legally silenced all medieval and early modern married women; they do so by carefully analyzing specific examples of wives exerting some degree of control in legal situations, often involving property. Although given the broad span of both time and space, the number of these women is quite small and, in some instances, the amount of control is negligible. Nevertheless, taken as a whole, the collection successfully demonstrates that, as with so many aspects of women's history, there was considerably more variation in coverture's application than was once thought. This conclusion is further substantiated by the wide variety of primary sources that the authors explore through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The essays also point toward fascinating avenues for further research. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. M. Pope Hiram College

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