Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Age of Reasons [electronic resource] : Quixotism, Sentimentalism, and Political Economy in Eighteenth Century Britain

By: Motooka, Wendy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Routledge Studies in Social and Political Thought: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2013Description: 1 online resource (296 p.).ISBN: 9781134689224.Subject(s): Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de, 1547-1616 -- Influence | Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de, 1547-1616 | Don Quixote | Economics -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | English fiction -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Great Britain -- Civilization -- 18th century | Philosophy, Modern -- 18th century | Rationalism in literature | Satire, English -- History and criticism | Sentimentalism in literature | Smith, Adam, 1723-1790Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Age of Reasons : Quixotism, Sentimentalism, and Political Economy in Eighteenth Century BritainDDC classification: 823.509355 | 823/.509355 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; THE AGE OF REASONS: Quixotism, sentimentalism and political economy in eighteenth-entury Britain; Copyright; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; ABBREVIATIONS; INTRODUCTION: The quixotic problem: questioning the self-evident; Defining the quixotic; The quixotic case of Captain Mostyn; Quixotism, feeling and sentimentalism; Sentimentalism and the "science of man"; 1 TURNING AUTHORITY INTO JEST: Tyrants, pedants, quixotes and enthusiasts in the early eighteenth century; Ridicule, reason and revolution; Reason in context: quixotism and arbitrary power; Quixotism and the Sacheverell affair
Universal quixotismRebellious subjects: gender, arbitrary power and the natural order; 2 COMMON SENSE, MORAL SENSE AND NONSENSE: Sentimentalism and the empirical study of invisible things; Authority, romance and the Royal Society; Seeing the "invisible union": empirical method, moral virtue and sentimental quixotism; The knowledge of benevolence: sentimental quixotism and Sarah Fielding''s David Simple; 3 COMING TO A BAD END: Sentimentalism, The Female Quixote and the power of interest; 4 SEEING THE GENERAL VIEW: Henry Fielding and quixotic authorship; Rational men and quixotic women
Rational men and quixotic authorshipQuixotism and Jacobitism; Sentimentalism and Sophia''s body; 5 DE GUSTIBUS NON EST DISPUTANDUM: Tristram Shandy and "the production of a rational Being"; Certain standards of taste: Hume and Gerard; Disputing against hobby-horses: Shandean rationality; The "already written" law of "God and reason"; 6 LAYING DOWN THE GENERAL RULE: Adam Smith, impartial spectators and the philosopher''s trade; Imagined philosophy, Newtonian method and the laughing artisan; Impartial spectators and the man within; The philosopher''s trade
EPILOGUE: "The grandsons of Adam Smith": of rational limits and quixotic excessNOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
Summary: Wendy Motooka contends that ''the Age of Reason'' was actually an Age of Reasons. Joining imaginative literature, moral philosophy, and the emerging discourse of the new science, she seeks to historicise the meaning of eighteenth-century ''reason'' and its supposed opposites, quixotism and sentimentalism. Reading novels by the Fieldings, Lennox and Sterne alongside the works of Adam Smith, Motooka argues that the legacy of sentimentalism is the social sciences. This book raises our understanding of eighteenth-century British culture and its relation to the ''rational'' culture of economics that is growing ever more prevasive today.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR858.E37 M68 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1192133 Available EBL1192133

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; THE AGE OF REASONS: Quixotism, sentimentalism and political economy in eighteenth-entury Britain; Copyright; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; ABBREVIATIONS; INTRODUCTION: The quixotic problem: questioning the self-evident; Defining the quixotic; The quixotic case of Captain Mostyn; Quixotism, feeling and sentimentalism; Sentimentalism and the "science of man"; 1 TURNING AUTHORITY INTO JEST: Tyrants, pedants, quixotes and enthusiasts in the early eighteenth century; Ridicule, reason and revolution; Reason in context: quixotism and arbitrary power; Quixotism and the Sacheverell affair

Universal quixotismRebellious subjects: gender, arbitrary power and the natural order; 2 COMMON SENSE, MORAL SENSE AND NONSENSE: Sentimentalism and the empirical study of invisible things; Authority, romance and the Royal Society; Seeing the "invisible union": empirical method, moral virtue and sentimental quixotism; The knowledge of benevolence: sentimental quixotism and Sarah Fielding''s David Simple; 3 COMING TO A BAD END: Sentimentalism, The Female Quixote and the power of interest; 4 SEEING THE GENERAL VIEW: Henry Fielding and quixotic authorship; Rational men and quixotic women

Rational men and quixotic authorshipQuixotism and Jacobitism; Sentimentalism and Sophia''s body; 5 DE GUSTIBUS NON EST DISPUTANDUM: Tristram Shandy and "the production of a rational Being"; Certain standards of taste: Hume and Gerard; Disputing against hobby-horses: Shandean rationality; The "already written" law of "God and reason"; 6 LAYING DOWN THE GENERAL RULE: Adam Smith, impartial spectators and the philosopher''s trade; Imagined philosophy, Newtonian method and the laughing artisan; Impartial spectators and the man within; The philosopher''s trade

EPILOGUE: "The grandsons of Adam Smith": of rational limits and quixotic excessNOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX

Wendy Motooka contends that ''the Age of Reason'' was actually an Age of Reasons. Joining imaginative literature, moral philosophy, and the emerging discourse of the new science, she seeks to historicise the meaning of eighteenth-century ''reason'' and its supposed opposites, quixotism and sentimentalism. Reading novels by the Fieldings, Lennox and Sterne alongside the works of Adam Smith, Motooka argues that the legacy of sentimentalism is the social sciences. This book raises our understanding of eighteenth-century British culture and its relation to the ''rational'' culture of economics that is growing ever more prevasive today.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.