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Women, Sexuality and the Political Power of Pleasure [electronic resource].

By: Jolly, Susie.
Contributor(s): Cornwall, Andrea | Hawkins, Kate.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Feminisms and Development: Publisher: London : Zed Books, 2013Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (321 p.).ISBN: 9781780325750.Subject(s): Sex -- Social aspects | Sex and law | Sexual orientationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women, Sexuality and the Political Power of PleasureDDC classification: 305.42 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Feminisms and Development; About the Editors; Title page; Copyright; Contents; Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Preface; Introduction | Women, Sexuality and the Political Power of Pleasure; Why we need to talk about pleasure; How to talk about pleasure; Whose pleasure?; How to work with pleasure; How not to work on pleasure; Pleasure and/as empowerment; References; 1 | Thinking with Pleasure: Danger, Sexuality and Agency; Telling stories, thinking with pleasure; The erotic project: commissioning brief; Conclusion; References
2 | Challenging the Pleasure versus Danger Binary: Reflections on Sexuality Workshops with Rural Women's Rights Activists in North IndiaWhy women's organizations are not engaging with sexuality in positive ways; Brokering conversations about sexuality and pleasure; Larger lessons from the programme; Conclusion; References; 3 | Sexual Pleasure as a Woman's Human Right: Experiences from a Human Rights Training Programme for Women in Turkey; Women's voices: Childhood, Menstruation; The Human Rights Education Programme for Women (HREP); Women and sexuality within the HREP
Women's voices: Lack of information/misinformationWomen's voices: Virginity, the hymen ('membrane of girlhood') and thefirst night of marriage; Women's voices: Pleasure; Notes; References; 4 | Better Sex and More Equal Relationships: Couple Training in Nigeria; Studying women's sexual pleasure; The INCRESE Sexual Pleasure Project; Lessons learnt; Implications for programming for women's health andrights; References; 5 | Building a Movement for Sexual Rights and Pleasure; Pink Space NGO: uniting marginalized sexual identities, organizing beyond identity politics
An exchange between lesbians and women living with HIV: finding common groundExchanges between gay men's wives; Developing an analysis: marriage normativity and compulsory heterosexuality; How we worked with pleasure; Conclusion; Note; Reference; 6 | Enabling Disabled People to Have and Enjoy the Kind of Sexuality They Want; The context of our experience; Defining sexuality and sexual health; Valuing sexual pleasure and intimacy; Importance of practitioner awareness; Practitioner comfort, knowledge and skills; Developing service policies; The Recognition Model; Table 6.1 The Recognition Model
Sex work, surrogacy and the legal frameworkConclusion; Notes; References; 7 | Desires Denied: Sexual Pleasure in the Context of HIV; Women in their place: opposite sides of the same coin - forced sex and forced asexuality; Belief systems, sex and women; Influences of belief systems on the law; Influences of belief systems on medicine and health care; Medical traditions, scientific advances and the tyranny of belief systems; Legal approaches to asexuality of women with HIV; Consequences of these policies and practices for women with HIV; Human rights: reframing the medical and legal landscape
Acknowledgements
Summary: Gender and development tends to engage with sexuality only in relation to violence and ill-health. Important as this is, this negative emphasis dovetails with ideologies that associate women's sexualities with danger. On the other hand, the media, pharma industry and pornography celebrate the pleasures of sex in ways that can be just as oppressive. This pioneering collection challenges these strictures with examples of activism that use pleasure as an entry point for enhancing equality for all.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ21 .J384 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1218805 Available EBL1218805

Description based upon print version of record.

Feminisms and Development; About the Editors; Title page; Copyright; Contents; Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Preface; Introduction | Women, Sexuality and the Political Power of Pleasure; Why we need to talk about pleasure; How to talk about pleasure; Whose pleasure?; How to work with pleasure; How not to work on pleasure; Pleasure and/as empowerment; References; 1 | Thinking with Pleasure: Danger, Sexuality and Agency; Telling stories, thinking with pleasure; The erotic project: commissioning brief; Conclusion; References

2 | Challenging the Pleasure versus Danger Binary: Reflections on Sexuality Workshops with Rural Women's Rights Activists in North IndiaWhy women's organizations are not engaging with sexuality in positive ways; Brokering conversations about sexuality and pleasure; Larger lessons from the programme; Conclusion; References; 3 | Sexual Pleasure as a Woman's Human Right: Experiences from a Human Rights Training Programme for Women in Turkey; Women's voices: Childhood, Menstruation; The Human Rights Education Programme for Women (HREP); Women and sexuality within the HREP

Women's voices: Lack of information/misinformationWomen's voices: Virginity, the hymen ('membrane of girlhood') and thefirst night of marriage; Women's voices: Pleasure; Notes; References; 4 | Better Sex and More Equal Relationships: Couple Training in Nigeria; Studying women's sexual pleasure; The INCRESE Sexual Pleasure Project; Lessons learnt; Implications for programming for women's health andrights; References; 5 | Building a Movement for Sexual Rights and Pleasure; Pink Space NGO: uniting marginalized sexual identities, organizing beyond identity politics

An exchange between lesbians and women living with HIV: finding common groundExchanges between gay men's wives; Developing an analysis: marriage normativity and compulsory heterosexuality; How we worked with pleasure; Conclusion; Note; Reference; 6 | Enabling Disabled People to Have and Enjoy the Kind of Sexuality They Want; The context of our experience; Defining sexuality and sexual health; Valuing sexual pleasure and intimacy; Importance of practitioner awareness; Practitioner comfort, knowledge and skills; Developing service policies; The Recognition Model; Table 6.1 The Recognition Model

Sex work, surrogacy and the legal frameworkConclusion; Notes; References; 7 | Desires Denied: Sexual Pleasure in the Context of HIV; Women in their place: opposite sides of the same coin - forced sex and forced asexuality; Belief systems, sex and women; Influences of belief systems on the law; Influences of belief systems on medicine and health care; Medical traditions, scientific advances and the tyranny of belief systems; Legal approaches to asexuality of women with HIV; Consequences of these policies and practices for women with HIV; Human rights: reframing the medical and legal landscape

Acknowledgements

Gender and development tends to engage with sexuality only in relation to violence and ill-health. Important as this is, this negative emphasis dovetails with ideologies that associate women's sexualities with danger. On the other hand, the media, pharma industry and pornography celebrate the pleasures of sex in ways that can be just as oppressive. This pioneering collection challenges these strictures with examples of activism that use pleasure as an entry point for enhancing equality for all.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andrea Cornwall is professor in anthropology and development at the University of Sussex, where she is an affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence and director of the Pathways of Women's Empowerment programme. As a teenager, she harboured a secret desire to be an agony aunt when she grew up, inspired by clandestine readings of her mother's Cosmopolitan, but became an anthropologist instead, focusing much of her research on gender, sexuality, sex and relationships. Joining the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) as a fellow in 1998, she supported the emergence of work on sexuality and helped establish the Sexuality and Development Programme. She has published widely on gender and sexuality in development and is executive producer of Save us from Saviours, a short film on Indian sex workers' challenge of the rescue industry.Kate Hawkins is director of Pamoja Communications and a visiting fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS). She has worked as a policy analyst and advocate on sexual and reproductive health and rights. With Susie Jolly, Andrea Cornwall and others, Kate has contributed to the Sexuality and Development Programme at IDS with a particular focus on how research influences policy and practice and the improvement of communication and knowledge exchange. Kate is on the Steering Committee of The Pleasure Project, an initiative which aims to make sex safer by addressing one of the major reasons people have sex: the pursuit of pleasure.Susie Jolly is a hybrid activist/researcher/communicator/trainer and is currently also a donor. From her different positions she consistently seeks to challenge the 'straitjacket' of gender and sexuality norms that disempower so many people. She currently leads the Ford Foundation sexuality and reproductive health and rights grant-making programme in China. Previously, she founded and led the Sexuality and Development Programme at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS). She has had extensive engagement with gender and development issues internationally, with six years' experience at the BRIDGE gender information unit, IDS, as well as a lifetime of feminist activism.

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