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In the Twilight of Patriarchal Culture [electronic resource].

By: Ernst, Astrid.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: : Diplomica Verlag, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (81 p.).ISBN: 9783954895199.Subject(s): Meyer, Stephenie, 1973- -- Twilight saga series | Sex role in literature | Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Young adult fiction, American -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In the Twilight of Patriarchal Culture: The Struggle for Female Identity in Stephenie Meyer''s Twilight SagaDDC classification: 813.6 LOC classification: PS3613 .E979Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
In the Twilight of Patriarchal Culture; Table of Contents; 1. Introduction; 2. Tracing Bella's Subjectivity: Ideal Love as the only Way Out; 3. Edward and Jacob: magnets with reversed polarities or two poles of Bella's existence?; 4. The Cullen Vampires: the ideal family and its enemies; 4.1. Carlisle and Edward Cullen; 4.2. Esme Cullen; 4.3. Rosalie Cullen; 4.4. Alice Cullen; 4.5. The Cullens' Enemies: The Volturi and Victoria; 5. Quileute Legends: re-affirming patriarchal myths; 6. The Power of Abstinence?; 7. The Dawn of Bella's Immortality
7.1. Bella's transformations: marriage, pregnancy, motherhood7.2. Bella's new life: motherhood and other talents; 7.3. Renesmee: link between binaries, threat to the patriarchal order; 8. Twilight as Modern Fairy Tale: patriarchal myths reflected in the saga; 8.1. Little Red Riding Hood; 8.2. The Little Mermaid; 8.3. The Genesis; 9. Intertextuality: The Twilight Saga and Wuthering Heights; 10. Conclusion; 11. Bibliography
Summary: Hauptbeschreibung The book investigates Meyer''s popular Twilight saga from a feminist point of view, focusing on the development of Bella''s character and her quest for identity in a rigidly patriarchal world. Bella''s life is entirely determined by the two central male characters who form a polarized axis which slowly tears her apart. Bella''s low self-esteem and her strong attachment to the over-idealized Edward Cullen are read as symptoms of her placelessness in a world that does not grant her space to develop as an autonomous subject. Bella''s wish to become a vampire can be equalled with a woman''s desire to gain access to a higher social realm via her husband and thereby escape her marginalisation in patriarchal culture. In order to live eternally in the idealized, capitalist, patriarchal and overly religious world that Edward represents, Bella has to make a series of sacrifices. Leaving her mother behind, she moves into a male dominated world which is divided into morally idealized vampires and racially devalued werewolves. She is forced to give up her friendship with Jacob Black, who represents her autonomous self, in order to find her patriarchal pre-defined destiny as mother and wife. Similar patterns of stereotypical representations of femininity can be found in various characters of the saga. A more controversial note is brought in by Bella''s half-vampire child who can be seen as a destabilizing factor of the saga''s rigid dichotomy. Taking all this into consideration, we have to ask whether it is desirable that millions of young women worldwide admire Bella and set her up as their role model.   Biographische Informationen Astrid Ernst, Mag. Phil., was born in Linz in 1983. During her studies of Anglistik and Amerikanistik at the University of Wien, she specialised in culture and gender studies. Through her long-term interest in post-structural feminist theory and its application to literary works, she found the research topic for her Diplomarbeit: ''Tracing Female Subjectivity and Self-affirmation in Meyer''s Twilight Saga''. With this thesis, she successfully completed her studies in 2012. As a freelance journalist, she works among others for the environmental protection organization Global 2000.
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PS3613 .E979 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1324029 Available EBL1324029

Description based upon print version of record.

In the Twilight of Patriarchal Culture; Table of Contents; 1. Introduction; 2. Tracing Bella's Subjectivity: Ideal Love as the only Way Out; 3. Edward and Jacob: magnets with reversed polarities or two poles of Bella's existence?; 4. The Cullen Vampires: the ideal family and its enemies; 4.1. Carlisle and Edward Cullen; 4.2. Esme Cullen; 4.3. Rosalie Cullen; 4.4. Alice Cullen; 4.5. The Cullens' Enemies: The Volturi and Victoria; 5. Quileute Legends: re-affirming patriarchal myths; 6. The Power of Abstinence?; 7. The Dawn of Bella's Immortality

7.1. Bella's transformations: marriage, pregnancy, motherhood7.2. Bella's new life: motherhood and other talents; 7.3. Renesmee: link between binaries, threat to the patriarchal order; 8. Twilight as Modern Fairy Tale: patriarchal myths reflected in the saga; 8.1. Little Red Riding Hood; 8.2. The Little Mermaid; 8.3. The Genesis; 9. Intertextuality: The Twilight Saga and Wuthering Heights; 10. Conclusion; 11. Bibliography

Hauptbeschreibung The book investigates Meyer''s popular Twilight saga from a feminist point of view, focusing on the development of Bella''s character and her quest for identity in a rigidly patriarchal world. Bella''s life is entirely determined by the two central male characters who form a polarized axis which slowly tears her apart. Bella''s low self-esteem and her strong attachment to the over-idealized Edward Cullen are read as symptoms of her placelessness in a world that does not grant her space to develop as an autonomous subject. Bella''s wish to become a vampire can be equalled with a woman''s desire to gain access to a higher social realm via her husband and thereby escape her marginalisation in patriarchal culture. In order to live eternally in the idealized, capitalist, patriarchal and overly religious world that Edward represents, Bella has to make a series of sacrifices. Leaving her mother behind, she moves into a male dominated world which is divided into morally idealized vampires and racially devalued werewolves. She is forced to give up her friendship with Jacob Black, who represents her autonomous self, in order to find her patriarchal pre-defined destiny as mother and wife. Similar patterns of stereotypical representations of femininity can be found in various characters of the saga. A more controversial note is brought in by Bella''s half-vampire child who can be seen as a destabilizing factor of the saga''s rigid dichotomy. Taking all this into consideration, we have to ask whether it is desirable that millions of young women worldwide admire Bella and set her up as their role model.   Biographische Informationen Astrid Ernst, Mag. Phil., was born in Linz in 1983. During her studies of Anglistik and Amerikanistik at the University of Wien, she specialised in culture and gender studies. Through her long-term interest in post-structural feminist theory and its application to literary works, she found the research topic for her Diplomarbeit: ''Tracing Female Subjectivity and Self-affirmation in Meyer''s Twilight Saga''. With this thesis, she successfully completed her studies in 2012. As a freelance journalist, she works among others for the environmental protection organization Global 2000.

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