Women on Probation and Parole : A Feminist Critique of Community Programs and Services

By: Morash, MerryMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandNortheastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law: Publisher: Lebanon : Northeastern University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (194 p.)ISBN: 9781555537333Subject(s): Crime - Sex differences | Crime -- Sex differences | Female offenders | Female offenders | Women drug addicts - Rehabilitation | Women drug addicts -- RehabilitationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women on Probation and Parole : A Feminist Critique of Community Programs and ServicesDDC classification: 364.6/20820973 | 364.620820973 LOC classification: HV6046 .M627 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Title Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1: Introduction; I: The Women on Probation and Parole; 2: Dominant Crimes; 3: Women''s Characteristics by Dominant Crime Subgroup; II: Outcomes in the Two Counties; 4: Drug Users Who Fail; 5: Supervision for Women Using Drugs but Not Failing; 6: Positive Changes for Substance-Centered Women; 7: Keeping Women off Drugs; 8: Supervision for Women without Drug Problems; 9: Conclusion; Appendixes; A: Survey Questions for Supervising Officers; B: Interview Questions for Women on Probation or Parole; References; Index; Back Cover
Summary: The first in-depth comparative look at gender-responsive versus traditional probation and parole for women
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV6046 .M627 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1084913 Available EBL1084913

Front Cover; Title Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1: Introduction; I: The Women on Probation and Parole; 2: Dominant Crimes; 3: Women''s Characteristics by Dominant Crime Subgroup; II: Outcomes in the Two Counties; 4: Drug Users Who Fail; 5: Supervision for Women Using Drugs but Not Failing; 6: Positive Changes for Substance-Centered Women; 7: Keeping Women off Drugs; 8: Supervision for Women without Drug Problems; 9: Conclusion; Appendixes; A: Survey Questions for Supervising Officers; B: Interview Questions for Women on Probation or Parole; References; Index; Back Cover

The first in-depth comparative look at gender-responsive versus traditional probation and parole for women

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Criminologists studying corrections have long acknowledged that women inmates have special needs that require programmatic variations from the typical corrections designed for men. This understanding has only slowly affected correctional policy and practice, but even then has often resulted in programs supporting stereotypes of women as mothers and caregivers and/or in intensive supervision programs designed more to protect the public than to aid the integration of women inmates back into the daily social life of the community. Using a qualitative approach, Morash (Michigan State Univ.) compares two county probation/parole programs and their treatment of women. One program uses a traditional approach where men and women are treated the same and clients are periodically contacted and lightly supervised. The second, a gender-responsive program, requires more personal involvement in the women's lives. While leading to more short periods of reinstitutionalization, according to Morash this latter program is more successful in helping women regain their footing in community life. A very well-written but highly technical and detailed research monograph that will mainly be of interest to those criminology scholars studying what Morash calls "gender-responsive probation and parole." Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty/professionals. G. C. Leavitt Idaho State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MERRY MORASH is a professor in the School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University. She is an American Society of Criminology Fellow and recipient of its Division on Women and Crime distinguished scholar award.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.