Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy : Beyond the Weapons of the Weak

By: Kabeer, Naila.
Contributor(s): Sudarshan, Ratna | Milward, Kirsty.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Feminisms and Development: Publisher: London : Zed Books, 2013Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (314 p.).ISBN: 9781780324531.Subject(s): Women -- Employment -- History | Women -- Employment -- United States -- Statistics | Women -- Employment -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy : Beyond the Weapons of the WeakDDC classification: 331.4 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Feminisms and Development; About the editors; Title page; Copyright; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; Preface by Andrea Cornwall; References; Introduction | Beyond the Weapons of the Weak: Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy; The organizational challenge of the informal economy; The strategic choice of organizational models; Building a shared identity; The resources of 'soft power'; Everyday practical support; The struggle for social security; Participating in politics; Dealing with inequalities; Building alliances: global and local; Conclusion: some broad lessons; Notes
References1 | Women and Rural Trade Unions in North-East Brazil; Methodology; Women in Brazilian agriculture: the broader context; Women workers in the São Francisco Valley grape sector; Rural trade unions and women workers; Conclusions; Notes; References; 2 | Understanding the Dynamics of an NGO/MBO Partnership: Organizing and Working with Farm Women in South Africa; Overview of WFP; Circumstances giving rise to the formation of Sikhula Sonke; Stages in the relationship between WFP and Sikhula Sonke; Box 2.1 Strategic complementarities: a case study; Conclusions; Notes; References
3 | Organizing for Life and Livelihoods in the Mountains of Uttarakhand: The Experience of Uttarakhand Mahila ParishadThe organization; Organizing women; Uttarakhand Mahila Parishad; Redefining needs, widening space; The political construction of livelihoods; UMP's approach; Ethics of creating ecological wealth in villages; Valuing each WVG as a unique collective; Activities; Political activism; Box 3.1 Activities supported by UMP; Challenges; Conclusion; Notes; References; 4 | Negotiating Patriarchies: Women Fisheries Workers Build SNEHA in Tamil Nadu
Patriarchy and power in the fishing communitiesThe gender division of labour within fishing communities; SNEHA's approach and strategies; Current concerns, broader challenges; Conclusion; Notes; References; 5 | 'If You Don't See a Light in the Darkness, You Must Light a Fire': Brazilian Domestic Workers' Struggle for Rights; The struggle for domestic workers' rights in Brazil; Organizing for change; Conclusion; Acknowledgement; Notes; References; 6 | The Challenge of Organizing Domestic Workers in Bangalore: Caste, Gender and Employer-Employee Relations in the Informal Economy
The context: domestic work and gradual commercializationInitiating the Karnataka Domestic Workers' Union; Building up the KDWU; Involving the community; Looking to the future; Notes; 7 | Power at the Bottom of the Heap: Organizing Waste Pickers in Pune; Strategies and approach; The role of national and international networks and alliances; Addressing inequalities within and beyond KKPKP; Conclusion - and future challenges; Notes; References; 8 | Sex, Work and Citizenship: The VAMP Sex Workers' Collective in Maharashtra; Sex and sex workers; Strategies of resistance: collectivization
Asymmetries of power
Summary: Women as a group have often been divided by a number of intersecting inequalities: class, race, ethnicity, caste. As individuals, often isolated in home-based work, their resistance has tended to be restricted to the traditional weapons of the weak. Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy explores the emergence of an alternative repertoire among women working in the growing informal sectors of the global South: the weapons of organization and mobilization.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6058 .K384 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1140206 Available EBL1140206

Feminisms and Development; About the editors; Title page; Copyright; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; Preface by Andrea Cornwall; References; Introduction | Beyond the Weapons of the Weak: Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy; The organizational challenge of the informal economy; The strategic choice of organizational models; Building a shared identity; The resources of 'soft power'; Everyday practical support; The struggle for social security; Participating in politics; Dealing with inequalities; Building alliances: global and local; Conclusion: some broad lessons; Notes

References1 | Women and Rural Trade Unions in North-East Brazil; Methodology; Women in Brazilian agriculture: the broader context; Women workers in the São Francisco Valley grape sector; Rural trade unions and women workers; Conclusions; Notes; References; 2 | Understanding the Dynamics of an NGO/MBO Partnership: Organizing and Working with Farm Women in South Africa; Overview of WFP; Circumstances giving rise to the formation of Sikhula Sonke; Stages in the relationship between WFP and Sikhula Sonke; Box 2.1 Strategic complementarities: a case study; Conclusions; Notes; References

3 | Organizing for Life and Livelihoods in the Mountains of Uttarakhand: The Experience of Uttarakhand Mahila ParishadThe organization; Organizing women; Uttarakhand Mahila Parishad; Redefining needs, widening space; The political construction of livelihoods; UMP's approach; Ethics of creating ecological wealth in villages; Valuing each WVG as a unique collective; Activities; Political activism; Box 3.1 Activities supported by UMP; Challenges; Conclusion; Notes; References; 4 | Negotiating Patriarchies: Women Fisheries Workers Build SNEHA in Tamil Nadu

Patriarchy and power in the fishing communitiesThe gender division of labour within fishing communities; SNEHA's approach and strategies; Current concerns, broader challenges; Conclusion; Notes; References; 5 | 'If You Don't See a Light in the Darkness, You Must Light a Fire': Brazilian Domestic Workers' Struggle for Rights; The struggle for domestic workers' rights in Brazil; Organizing for change; Conclusion; Acknowledgement; Notes; References; 6 | The Challenge of Organizing Domestic Workers in Bangalore: Caste, Gender and Employer-Employee Relations in the Informal Economy

The context: domestic work and gradual commercializationInitiating the Karnataka Domestic Workers' Union; Building up the KDWU; Involving the community; Looking to the future; Notes; 7 | Power at the Bottom of the Heap: Organizing Waste Pickers in Pune; Strategies and approach; The role of national and international networks and alliances; Addressing inequalities within and beyond KKPKP; Conclusion - and future challenges; Notes; References; 8 | Sex, Work and Citizenship: The VAMP Sex Workers' Collective in Maharashtra; Sex and sex workers; Strategies of resistance: collectivization

Asymmetries of power

Women as a group have often been divided by a number of intersecting inequalities: class, race, ethnicity, caste. As individuals, often isolated in home-based work, their resistance has tended to be restricted to the traditional weapons of the weak. Organizing Women Workers in the Informal Economy explores the emergence of an alternative repertoire among women working in the growing informal sectors of the global South: the weapons of organization and mobilization.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Dedicated to feminist engagement with empowerment, these scholar-activist editors and contributors from South Asia, Brazil, and South Africa present case studies of women workers in the informal economy--that is, the unregulated economy, where wages are the lowest, and exploitation and abuse the highest. Women constitute a great number of workers in the informal sector of developing economies, which hires them (and often their children) predominately. Women workers challenge the conventional models of workers' organizations and struggles (trade unions, work stoppage, etc.), which are highly male-centered strategies, although the common principle of collective strategy of resistance remains. "Concentrated in casual, dispersed, part-time, irregular and often home-based activities," women are especially hard to reach, the book states. Case studies depict their work and their lives as domestics, waste pickers, sex workers, farm and other rural workers, and fisheries workers; they include one account of transborder organizing from Burma into Thailand. The alternative model or "different pathway of women empowerment" mobilizes them not just for better pay, but also for social justice, dignity, citizenship, and basic human rights. These are uplifting accounts of women and development, gender, and empowerment. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. Hu-DeHart Brown University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Naila Kabeer is Professor of Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University. She has extensive experience in research, teaching and advisory work on gender, poverty, labour markets, livelihoods, social protection and grassroots citizenship. Her publications include Reversed Realities: Gender hierarchies in Development Thought; The Power to Choose: Bangladeshi Women and Labour Market Decisions in London and Dhaka; and more recently, Gender and Social Protection in the Informal Economy. She has also edited a number of books, including Inclusive Citizenship: Meanings and Expressions and Institutions, Relations and Outcomes: Methodologies for Planning and Case Studies from the Indian Context, both published by Zed Books.Ratna Sudarshan is Advisor (Research and Projects) at the Institute of Social Studies Trust, New Delhi, where she was Director from 2003 to 2011. She has researched and published on women in the informal economy, with a special focus on home-based work, social protection and local economic development; gender and education; research and policy linkage; and gender and evaluation. Other recent publications include a co-edited special issue (on 'Evaluating gender and equity') of the Indian Journal of Gender Studies, 19, 2 (June 2012).Kirsty Milward founded and co-manages Suchana Uttor Chandipur Society, an organization offering education focused on social and gender equality amongst the Adivasi communities where she lives in West Bengal, India. She is also a freelance consultant providing writing, editing and evaluation services and specializing in gender and rural development. She has a particular interest in various organizational formations inspiring action to advance social and economic equality. Kirsty has an MA in gender and development from the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.