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In Love and Struggle : Letters in Contemporary Feminism

By: Jolly, Margaretta.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Gender and Culture Series: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (326 p.).ISBN: 9780231510752.Subject(s): Electronic mail messages -- Social aspects | Feminism -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Feminists -- Correspondence | Feminists -- Social networks | Letter writing -- History -- 20th century | Letters -- Women authors -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In Love and Struggle : Letters in Contemporary FeminismDDC classification: 305.42092/2 | 305.420922 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; INTRODUCTION; Part One; 1; 2; 3; Part Two; 4; 5; 6; 7; Part Three; 8; 9; 10; 11; Part Four; 12; 13; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index
Summary: Winner of the 2009 Feminist and Women''s Studies Association Book Prize Do you think I can be a feminist mother? Did I make you and your kisses up in my mind? Will you join our military protest at the gate? Will you feed the kids when I''m in prison? Are you able to forgive me for breaking off this correspondence because you are a man?During the women''s movement of the 1970s and 1980s, feminists in the United States and Britain reinvented the image of the woman letter writer. Symbolically tearing up the love letter to an absent man, they wrote passionate letters to one another, exploring questions of sexuality, separatism, and strategy. These texts speak of the new interest women began to feel in one another and the new demands& mdash;and disappointments& mdash;these relationships would create. Margaretta Jolly provides the first cultural study of these letters, charting the evolution of feminist political consciousness from the height of the women''s movement to today''s e-mail networks. Jolly uncovers the passionate, contradictory emotions of both politics and letter writing and sets out the theory behind them as a fragile yet persistent ideal of care ethics, women''s love, and epistolary art. She follows several compelling feminist relationships sustained through writing and confronts the mixed messages of the "open letter," which complicated political relations between women (such as Audre Lorde''s "Open Letter to Mary Daly," which called out white feminists for their implicit racism).Jolly recovers the unsung literature of lesbianism and feminist romance, examines the ambivalent feelings within mother-daughter correspondences, and considers letter-writing campaigns during the peace movement. She concludes with a discussion of the ethical dilemma surrounding care versus autonomy and the meaning behind the burning or saving of letters. Letters that chart love stories, letters stowed away in attics, letters burnt at the end of romances, bittersweet letters written but never sent... this fascinating glimpse into women''s intimate archives illuminates one of feminism''s central concerns& mdash;that all relationships are political& mdash;and uniquely recasts a social movement in very emotional terms.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HQ1154 .J573 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=908487 Available EBL908487

Contents; INTRODUCTION; Part One; 1; 2; 3; Part Two; 4; 5; 6; 7; Part Three; 8; 9; 10; 11; Part Four; 12; 13; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index

Winner of the 2009 Feminist and Women''s Studies Association Book Prize Do you think I can be a feminist mother? Did I make you and your kisses up in my mind? Will you join our military protest at the gate? Will you feed the kids when I''m in prison? Are you able to forgive me for breaking off this correspondence because you are a man?During the women''s movement of the 1970s and 1980s, feminists in the United States and Britain reinvented the image of the woman letter writer. Symbolically tearing up the love letter to an absent man, they wrote passionate letters to one another, exploring questions of sexuality, separatism, and strategy. These texts speak of the new interest women began to feel in one another and the new demands& mdash;and disappointments& mdash;these relationships would create. Margaretta Jolly provides the first cultural study of these letters, charting the evolution of feminist political consciousness from the height of the women''s movement to today''s e-mail networks. Jolly uncovers the passionate, contradictory emotions of both politics and letter writing and sets out the theory behind them as a fragile yet persistent ideal of care ethics, women''s love, and epistolary art. She follows several compelling feminist relationships sustained through writing and confronts the mixed messages of the "open letter," which complicated political relations between women (such as Audre Lorde''s "Open Letter to Mary Daly," which called out white feminists for their implicit racism).Jolly recovers the unsung literature of lesbianism and feminist romance, examines the ambivalent feelings within mother-daughter correspondences, and considers letter-writing campaigns during the peace movement. She concludes with a discussion of the ethical dilemma surrounding care versus autonomy and the meaning behind the burning or saving of letters. Letters that chart love stories, letters stowed away in attics, letters burnt at the end of romances, bittersweet letters written but never sent... this fascinating glimpse into women''s intimate archives illuminates one of feminism''s central concerns& mdash;that all relationships are political& mdash;and uniquely recasts a social movement in very emotional terms.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Using public and private letters, Jolly (Univ. of Sussex, UK) opens a window through which one can view the lives of women struggling to define themselves personally and politically within the second wave of feminism, which began in the 1960s. This is an important work because women's writings are often lost and forgotten over time, effectively cutting today's women off from their social/political history. Delving into letters (and e-mails) written by women to women, Jolly explores intimate relationships, mother-daughter relationships, and the broad concept of sisterhood--including the numerous points of intersection of gender, sex, class, and race. In so doing, she gives the reader an opportunity not only to appreciate the sharing of words and ideas but also to look deeper--to explore beyond the gender-class consciousness and see the "unconscious expressions of women's expectation of care," the ethics of care being one of the book's major themes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. K.G. Saulton Capella University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Margaretta Jolly is a director of the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research and senior lecturer at the University of Sussex, as well as the editor of The Encyclopedia of Life Writing and Dear Laughing Motorbyke: Letters from Women Welders of the Second World War .

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