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Women and the U.S. Constitution : History, Interpretation, and Practice

By: Schwarzenbach, Sibyl A.
Contributor(s): Smith, Patricia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (415 p.).ISBN: 9780231502962.Subject(s): Constitutional history - United States | Women - Legal status, laws, etc. - United States - History | Women''s rights - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women and the U.S. Constitution : History, Interpretation, and PracticeDDC classification: 342.73 | 342.730878 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Women and Constitutional Interpretation: The Forgotten Value of Civic Friendship; PART 1 History: The Founding Period; 2. Representatoin of Women in the Constitution; 3. Declarations of Independence: Women and Divorce in the Early Republic ; 4. The Explanation Lies in Property: Gender and Its Connection to Economic Considerations; RECONSTRUCTION; 5. Women, Bondage, and the Reconstructed Constitution; 6. The Unkept Promise of the Thirteenth Amendment: A Call for Reparations; WOMEN AND THE WELFARE STATE
7. The Culture of Work Enforcement: Race, Gender, and U.S. Welfare Policy8. The Silent Constitution: Affirmative Obligation and the Feminization of Poverty; PART 2 Interpretation; The U.S. Constitutionin Comparitive Context; 9. Federalism(s), Feminism, Families, and the Constitution; 10. What''s Privacy Got to Do With It? A Comparitive Approach to the Feminist Critique; 11. Women''s Human Rights and the U.S. Constitution: Initiating a Dialogue; PRIVACY AND FAMILY LAW; 12. Battered Women, Feminist Lawmaking, Privacy and Equality
13. Infringements of Women''s Constitutional Rights in Religious Lawmaking on Abortion14. What Place for Family Privacy? ; 15. The Right to Privacy and Gay/Lesbian Sexuality ; WOMEN AND WORK ; 16. The Gender of Discrimination: Race, Sex, and Fair Employment; 17. Second Generation Employment Discrimination: A Structural Approach ; 18. Our Economy of Mothers and Others: Women and Economics Revisited; PART 3 Practice; Citizenship and the Equal Rights Amendment; 19. Women and Citizenship: The Virginia Military Institute Case
20. "Heightened Scrutiny": An Alternative Route to Constitutional Equality for U.S. Women21. Whatever Happened to the ERA?; About the Contributors; Index
Summary: Women and the U.S. Constitution is about much more than the nineteenth amendment. This provocative volume incorporates law, history, political theory, and philosophy to analyze the U.S. Constitution as a whole in relation to the rights and fate
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Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Women and Constitutional Interpretation: The Forgotten Value of Civic Friendship; PART 1 History: The Founding Period; 2. Representatoin of Women in the Constitution; 3. Declarations of Independence: Women and Divorce in the Early Republic ; 4. The Explanation Lies in Property: Gender and Its Connection to Economic Considerations; RECONSTRUCTION; 5. Women, Bondage, and the Reconstructed Constitution; 6. The Unkept Promise of the Thirteenth Amendment: A Call for Reparations; WOMEN AND THE WELFARE STATE

7. The Culture of Work Enforcement: Race, Gender, and U.S. Welfare Policy8. The Silent Constitution: Affirmative Obligation and the Feminization of Poverty; PART 2 Interpretation; The U.S. Constitutionin Comparitive Context; 9. Federalism(s), Feminism, Families, and the Constitution; 10. What''s Privacy Got to Do With It? A Comparitive Approach to the Feminist Critique; 11. Women''s Human Rights and the U.S. Constitution: Initiating a Dialogue; PRIVACY AND FAMILY LAW; 12. Battered Women, Feminist Lawmaking, Privacy and Equality

13. Infringements of Women''s Constitutional Rights in Religious Lawmaking on Abortion14. What Place for Family Privacy? ; 15. The Right to Privacy and Gay/Lesbian Sexuality ; WOMEN AND WORK ; 16. The Gender of Discrimination: Race, Sex, and Fair Employment; 17. Second Generation Employment Discrimination: A Structural Approach ; 18. Our Economy of Mothers and Others: Women and Economics Revisited; PART 3 Practice; Citizenship and the Equal Rights Amendment; 19. Women and Citizenship: The Virginia Military Institute Case

20. "Heightened Scrutiny": An Alternative Route to Constitutional Equality for U.S. Women21. Whatever Happened to the ERA?; About the Contributors; Index

Women and the U.S. Constitution is about much more than the nineteenth amendment. This provocative volume incorporates law, history, political theory, and philosophy to analyze the U.S. Constitution as a whole in relation to the rights and fate

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The 21 essays in this collection originated in an interdisciplinary conference at Baruch College in 2001. Professors of law, history, political science, philosophy, and women's studies contribute insightful and thought-provoking papers, most not previously published as written, although several are reworks. The title is misleading, since only about half the essays deal directly with the Constitution or focus directly on constitutional issues except in the general sense that all US public policy issues are discussed in the context of a system grounded in a constitution and the possibility of judicial review. The collection lacks a sense of unity, with a preface only minimally setting the context and no other editorial introductions or summaries. Indeed, why articles belong in one of the three sections--history, interpretation, and practice--and not another is unclear. Some of the contested issues in feminist jurisprudence are raised. These include privacy as a constitutional protection for or against women; whether equal protection requires same or different treatment; the extent to which race and gender have additive or interactive impacts on citizens; and what judicial test should be used in cases involving sex and gender. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. Shrewsbury emeritus, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sibyl A. Schwarzenbach is associate professor of philosophy at Baruch College and The Graduate Center, The City University of New York. She is the author of On Civic Friendship (forthcoming) as well as of numerous articles in social, political, and feminist theory. Patricia Smith is professor of philosophy at Baruch College and The Graduate Center, The City University of New York. She is the author of Liberalism and Affirmative Obligation and the editor of numerous volumes including Feminist Jurisprudence.

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