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Kitchen Table Entrepreneurs : How Eleven Women Escaped Poverty And Became Their Own Bosses

By: Shirk, Martha.
Contributor(s): Wadia, Anna S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Basic Books, 2009Description: 1 online resource (369 p.).ISBN: 9780786749126.Subject(s): Businesswomen - United States | Businesswomen -- United States -- Biography | Entrepreneurship - United States | Entrepreneurship -- United States -- Case studies | Self-employed women - United States | Self-employed women -- United States -- Biography | Women-owned business enterprises - United States | Women-owned business enterprises -- United States -- Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Kitchen Table Entrepreneurs : How Eleven Women Escaped Poverty And Became Their Own BossesDDC classification: 338.6420820973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Photos; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Moving Up, One Hot Dog at a Time ; 2. An Artist with a Pastry Knife; 3. "God Gave Me Knowledge" ; 4. "I''m Lucky to Be Alive" ; 5. Chasing the American Dream ; 6. "Making the Planet a Better Place" ; 7. Lighting the World ; 8. God, Family, and an Electric Knitting Machine ; 9. "Life Happens" ; Conclusion: Building Businesses, Changing Lives; Epilogue; Appendix A: What the Research Tells Us ; Appendix B: Microenterprise Resources; References; Index; About the Authors
Summary: Inspirational stories of eleven low-income women who are moving their families out of poverty by starting their own businesses
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6072.6.U5 S557 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=978643 Available EBL978643

Contents; Photos; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Moving Up, One Hot Dog at a Time ; 2. An Artist with a Pastry Knife; 3. "God Gave Me Knowledge" ; 4. "I''m Lucky to Be Alive" ; 5. Chasing the American Dream ; 6. "Making the Planet a Better Place" ; 7. Lighting the World ; 8. God, Family, and an Electric Knitting Machine ; 9. "Life Happens" ; Conclusion: Building Businesses, Changing Lives; Epilogue; Appendix A: What the Research Tells Us ; Appendix B: Microenterprise Resources; References; Index; About the Authors

Inspirational stories of eleven low-income women who are moving their families out of poverty by starting their own businesses

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In the United States, the number of women-owned companies is growing at twice the rate of all firms and will reach six million this year. This trend is exemplified by the 11 entrepreneurial or micro-enterprise case studies covered here. These female entrepreneurs worked their way out of poverty, often balancing the obligations of single parenthood and work and taking risks to achieve the dream of success for themselves. Their enterprises encompass many different industries, including retail, restaurant, and small manufacturing, and are located throughout the United States. These women were assisted by various nonprofit organizations, like the Ms. Foundation for Women, that support economic development through micro-enterprises. Documentary black-and-white photographs capture the hard work and spirit of the women and their families, and two appendixes provide additional data on micro-enterprise research and resources available to help new businesses. These studies by journalist Shirk and Wadia, a program director at the Ms. Foundation, should be included in business and women's studies collections in academic and public libraries.-Susan C. Awe, Univ. of New Mexico Lib., Albuquerque (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Shirk (a journalist) and Wadia (program director, Ms. Foundation for Women) have written an inspiring chronicle of how 11 women in the US became successful microentrepreneurs. These women faced obstacles because most were minorities, lacked formal education, and were single mothers. In most cases they needed an infusion of capital from insurance settlements, subsidized loans, or out-and-out grants. The authors describe how these women established their businesses, which range from cake decorating and jewelry designing to daycare and an auto parts store. The book contains a partial listing of the major organizations that provide aid to aspiring female entrepreneurs and some statistics indicating the success of various plans. Anecdotally, these stories indicate that some governmental regulations can hinder more than help aspiring entrepreneurs, e.g., welfare regulations that prohibit women from accumulating capital for a business start-up. In reading these accounts of "kitchen table entrepreneurs," however, readers may be more impressed by the pluck and initiative of these women, rather than by the success of any specific program. Worthwhile reading for aspiring entrepreneurs, social work students, and policy makers. Public and academic library collections, lower-division undergraduate and up. E. P. Hoffman Western Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Martha Shirk , a journalist who specializes in social issues, is co-author of Lives on the Line . She lives in Palo Alto, California.<br> <br> Anna Wadia is a program director at the Ms. Foundation in New York City.

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