Wild Blessings : The Poetry of Lucille Clifton

By: Holladay, HilaryMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandSouthern Literary Studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2012Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (273 p.)ISBN: 9780807144619Subject(s): Clifton, Lucille, 1936- -- Criticism and interpretation | Women and literature -- Southern States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Wild Blessings : The Poetry of Lucille CliftonDDC classification: 811.54 LOC classification: PS3553.L45 Z68Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Chronology; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Light Years; 2 Dark Blessings; 3 Song of Herself; 4 Plath, Clifton, and the Myths of Menstruation; 5 The Biblical Poems; 6 Diabolic Dialogism in "brothers"; 7 Elegies for Thelma; 8 Concentric Circles of Selfhood in Generations; 9 Lucille Talks about Lucille: An Interview; Epilogue: Last Words in Mercy and Voices; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: In Wild Blessings, Hilary Holladay offers the first full-length study of Lucille Clifton''s acclaimed poetry, drawing on a broad knowledge of the American poetic tradition and African American poetry in particular. Holladay places Clifton''s poems in multiple contexts -- personal, political, and literary -- as she explicates major themes and analyzes specific works: Clifton''s poems about womanhood; her fertility poems, provocatively compared with Sylvia Plath''s poems on the same subject; her relation to the Black Arts Movement and to other black female poets, such as Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez; her biblical poems; her elegies; and her poignant family history, Generations, an extended prose poem. In addition to a new preface written after Clifton''s death in 2010, this updated edition includes an epilogue that discusses the poetry collections she published after 2004. Readers encountering Lucille Clifton''s poems for the first time and those long familiar with her distinctive voice will benefit from Holladay''s striking insights and her illuminating interview with the influential American poet.
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Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Chronology; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Light Years; 2 Dark Blessings; 3 Song of Herself; 4 Plath, Clifton, and the Myths of Menstruation; 5 The Biblical Poems; 6 Diabolic Dialogism in "brothers"; 7 Elegies for Thelma; 8 Concentric Circles of Selfhood in Generations; 9 Lucille Talks about Lucille: An Interview; Epilogue: Last Words in Mercy and Voices; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

In Wild Blessings, Hilary Holladay offers the first full-length study of Lucille Clifton''s acclaimed poetry, drawing on a broad knowledge of the American poetic tradition and African American poetry in particular. Holladay places Clifton''s poems in multiple contexts -- personal, political, and literary -- as she explicates major themes and analyzes specific works: Clifton''s poems about womanhood; her fertility poems, provocatively compared with Sylvia Plath''s poems on the same subject; her relation to the Black Arts Movement and to other black female poets, such as Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez; her biblical poems; her elegies; and her poignant family history, Generations, an extended prose poem. In addition to a new preface written after Clifton''s death in 2010, this updated edition includes an epilogue that discusses the poetry collections she published after 2004. Readers encountering Lucille Clifton''s poems for the first time and those long familiar with her distinctive voice will benefit from Holladay''s striking insights and her illuminating interview with the influential American poet.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Holladay (English,Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell) presents a glowing study of prolific poet, children's author, and educator Clifton, whose works celebrate black womanhood, the Bible, and the memories of loved ones. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Clifton won the National Book Award for poetry in 2000, and this first book-length study of her work focuses on ten volumes of poetry and her autobiographical Generations: A Memoir (1978). Holladay (Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell), author of the literary biography Ann Petry (1996), emphasizes "the nature of womanhood"--the female body and the female spirit--as Clifton's "consuming subject." Key among Clifton's women are Kali, the Hindu Great Mother; Mary, mother of Jesus; St. Joan of Arc, model of a female warrior; Clifton's mother, Thelma Sayles; and the poet herself, whose spiritual transformation in the late 1970s is reflected in her work. Playing on the name Lucille, especially in The Book of Light (1993), Clifton relates to both Lucifer and the opposing Light of God. Holladay describes Clifton's poems as "clear" and "deep"; most of them are also elegiac, whether her subject is her mother's fears or Native American Crazy Horse. The black arts movement and black theology are among the contexts Holladay develops for Clifton's books, e.g., Two-Headed Woman (1980). This readable study concludes with Holladay's 1998 interview with Clifton. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All academic libraries, lower-division undergraduate through faculty; general readers. J. W. Hall University of Mississippi

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Hilary Holladay is the author of American Hipster: A Life of Herbert Huncke, The Times Square Hustler Who Inspired the Beat Movement; Ann Petry; and the poetry collection The Dreams of Mary Rowlandson. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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