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College Women In The Nuclear Age : Cultural Literacy and Female Identity, 1940-1960

By: Faehmel, Babette.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Piscataway : Rutgers University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (251 p.).ISBN: 9780813553191.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sex differences in education -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- Education (Higher) -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women college students -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: College Women In The Nuclear Age : Cultural Literacy and Female Identity, 1940-1960DDC classification: 378.1/98220973 | 378.198220973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Conclusion; Student Diaries andLetters Consulted; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: In the popular imagination, American women during the time between the end of World War II and the 1960s-the era of the so-called "feminine mystique"-were ultraconservative and passive. College Women in the Nuclear Age takes a fresh look at these women, showing them actively searching for their place in the world while engaging with the larger intellectual and political movements of the times.  Drawing from the letters and diaries of young women in the Cold War era, Babette Faehmel seeks to restore their unique voices and to chronicle their collective ambitions.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LC1756 .F34 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=988919 Available EBL988919

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Conclusion; Student Diaries andLetters Consulted; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index

In the popular imagination, American women during the time between the end of World War II and the 1960s-the era of the so-called "feminine mystique"-were ultraconservative and passive. College Women in the Nuclear Age takes a fresh look at these women, showing them actively searching for their place in the world while engaging with the larger intellectual and political movements of the times.  Drawing from the letters and diaries of young women in the Cold War era, Babette Faehmel seeks to restore their unique voices and to chronicle their collective ambitions.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Faehmel (Schenectady County Comm. Coll.) challenges Betty Friedan's famous description of young women from liberal arts colleges as dupable consumers who made little use of their education. By using letters and diaries written by introspective female undergraduates in the mid-20th century, the author looks at a sample very similar to Friedan's Smith College respondents. Faehmel argues that these women conceived of difference as a special strength. Insisting on the centrality of their reproductive role, they embraced female distinctiveness after realistically weighing their options in a male-dominated society. This choice reflected an assertion of agency rather than a retreat to the home. Faehmel's prose is lively, and her summation of an era that is often ignored in accounts of women's history makes this into a useful book for college classrooms. Undergraduates are particular likely to connect with the diarists as they ruminate about identity, sexuality, and the life ahead of them. However, the sample, with only ten diaries and 20 letters, is far too small to be conclusive. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. E. Neumann Miami University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>BABETTE FAEHMEL is an assistant professor in the Liberal Arts Division at Schenectady County Community College, where she teaches U.S. and women's history.</p>

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