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Writing Medieval Women''s Lives.

By: Goldy, Charlotte Newman.
Contributor(s): Livingstone, Amy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The New Middle Ages: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012Description: 1 online resource (311 p.).ISBN: 9781137074706.Subject(s): HISTORY / Medieval | LITERARY CRITICISM / Medieval | LITERARY CRITICISM / Women Authors | Medievalists | Medievalists | Middle Ages - Historiography | Middle Ages -- Historiography | Women - History - Middle Ages, 500-1500 | Women -- History -- Middle Ages, 500-1500 | Women and literature - Europe - History - To 1500 | Women and literature -- Europe -- History -- To 1500Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Writing Medieval Women''s LivesDDC classification: 305.40902 | 809.892870902 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Figures and Table; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Setting the Scene; Part I Rereading Sources; 1. The Foundation Legend of Godstow Abbey: A Holy Woman's Life in Anglo-Norman Verse; 2. Remembering Countess Delphine's Books: Reading as a Means to Shape a Holy Woman's Sanctity; 3. The Letters of Princess Sophia of Hungary, a Nun at Admont; 4. The Missing Rusian Women: The Case of Evpraksia Vsevolodovna; 5. Leaving Warboys: Emigration from a Fifteenth-Century English Village; 6. Women as Legal Agents in Late Medieval Genoa
7. Piecing Together the Fragments: Telling the Lives of the Ladies of Lavardin through Image and TextPart II Seeking the Undocumented; 8. Girlindis and Alpais: Telling the Lives of Two Textile Fabricators in the Carolingian Empire; 9. Agents or Pawns? The Experiences of the Peasant Women of Roussillon in the Blanquet Family Parchments, 1292-1345; 10. Joan de Valence: A Lady of Substance; 11. Royal Women in Late Medieval Spain: Catalina of Lancaster, Leonor of Albuquerque, and María of Castile; 12. Muriel, a Jew of Oxford: Using the Dramatic to Understand the Mundane in Anglo-Norman Towns
13. Well-Behaved Women Can Make History: Women's Friendships in Late Medieval WestminsterSelect Bibliography of Secondary Sources; List of Contributors; Index
Summary: This book is a collection of thirteen essays representing the growing variety of approaches being used to write the history of medieval women. In the aggregate, the essays reflect the "European" medieval "world" socially, (peasants, urban women, religious women, aristocrats and queens), geographically (including medieval Rus) and across religious boundaries (Christian, Jewish and Muslim).  The authors use a variety of narrative strategies, including challenging the traditional authorial voice to place their subject in a better-documented context;  often addressing women''s less formal "communities"(such as generations, mentoring relationships within crafts, neighborhoods); and allow themselves to explore - in writing - unrecorded emotions and actions. Each contributor engages directly with how they go about reconstructing medieval women''s experience, as well as what that experience was.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN682.W6 W75 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1016523 Available EBL1016523

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Figures and Table; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Setting the Scene; Part I Rereading Sources; 1. The Foundation Legend of Godstow Abbey: A Holy Woman's Life in Anglo-Norman Verse; 2. Remembering Countess Delphine's Books: Reading as a Means to Shape a Holy Woman's Sanctity; 3. The Letters of Princess Sophia of Hungary, a Nun at Admont; 4. The Missing Rusian Women: The Case of Evpraksia Vsevolodovna; 5. Leaving Warboys: Emigration from a Fifteenth-Century English Village; 6. Women as Legal Agents in Late Medieval Genoa

7. Piecing Together the Fragments: Telling the Lives of the Ladies of Lavardin through Image and TextPart II Seeking the Undocumented; 8. Girlindis and Alpais: Telling the Lives of Two Textile Fabricators in the Carolingian Empire; 9. Agents or Pawns? The Experiences of the Peasant Women of Roussillon in the Blanquet Family Parchments, 1292-1345; 10. Joan de Valence: A Lady of Substance; 11. Royal Women in Late Medieval Spain: Catalina of Lancaster, Leonor of Albuquerque, and María of Castile; 12. Muriel, a Jew of Oxford: Using the Dramatic to Understand the Mundane in Anglo-Norman Towns

13. Well-Behaved Women Can Make History: Women's Friendships in Late Medieval WestminsterSelect Bibliography of Secondary Sources; List of Contributors; Index

This book is a collection of thirteen essays representing the growing variety of approaches being used to write the history of medieval women. In the aggregate, the essays reflect the "European" medieval "world" socially, (peasants, urban women, religious women, aristocrats and queens), geographically (including medieval Rus) and across religious boundaries (Christian, Jewish and Muslim).  The authors use a variety of narrative strategies, including challenging the traditional authorial voice to place their subject in a better-documented context;  often addressing women''s less formal "communities"(such as generations, mentoring relationships within crafts, neighborhoods); and allow themselves to explore - in writing - unrecorded emotions and actions. Each contributor engages directly with how they go about reconstructing medieval women''s experience, as well as what that experience was.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this latest volume in "The New Middle Ages" series, Goldy (Miami Univ.) and Livingstone (Wittenberg Univ.) have collected 13 fascinating essays that not only tease out the lives of several previously unexamined women, but also explore the multiplicity of sources for understanding medieval lives. The papers address an impressive variety of women across time, space, and the socioeconomic spectrum. Two unifying themes hold these disparate essays together: "Rereading Sources" and "Seeking the Undocumented." The juxtaposition of such diverse women as two Carolingian cloth workers, "Muriel, a Jew of Oxford," and Evpraksia Vsevolodovna, just to name a few, highlights the common difficulty of piecing together the history of medieval women and presents interesting new approaches to this enterprise. These approaches are the truly significant element of the volume. Many of the essays employ prosopographical techniques to fill lacunae in the evidence; as the editors say, many of the conclusions are speculative, but all of the authors are careful to lay out clearly the limitations of the sources and therefore the uncertainty of the interpretations. Useful bibliography of secondary sources. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. M. Pope Hiram College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Emilie Amt is the Hildegarde Pilgram Professor of History at Hood College. Nicole Archambeau is an ACLS New Faculty Fellow at Caltech.Anne Reiber DeWindt is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.Theresa Earenfight, Professor of History at Seattle University, Katherine French is the J. Frederick Hoffman Chair of Medieval English History at the University of Michigan. Valerie L. Garver is an associate Professor of History at Northern Illinois University where she teaches medieval history and medieval studies. Charlotte Newman Goldy is an associate professor of History at Miami University. Amy Livingstone is a Professor of History of Wittenberg University and co-editor of the journal, Medieval Prosopography. Jonathan Lyon is an assistant Professor of Medieval History at the University of Chicago. Linda E. Mitchell is the Martha Jane Phillips Starr/Missouri Distinguished Professor of Women's and Gender Studies and professor of History at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.Christian Raffensperger is Assistant Professor of History at Wittenberg University. Jamie Smith is an independent scholar. Rebecca Lynn Winer is an associate professor of History at Villanova University.

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