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Women and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Colonial Cuba.

By: Franklin, Sarah L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Rochester Studies in African History and the Diaspora: Publisher: Woodbridge : Boydell & Brewer, 2012Description: 1 online resource (240 p.).ISBN: 9781580467773.Subject(s): Cuba -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Paternalism -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Patriarchy -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Sex role -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Women -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Women slaves -- Cuba -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Colonial CubaDDC classification: 306.3/62082097291 | 306.362082097291 | 306.362097291 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontcover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Patriarchy, Paternalism, and the Development of the Slave Society; 1 Virgins and Mothers; 2 Wives; 3 Pupils; Table 3.1; Table 3.2; Table 3.3; Figure 3.1; Figure 3.2; Table 3.4; 4 The Needy; 5 Wet Nurses; Table 5.1; Table 5.2; Table 5.3; Table 5.4; Table 5.5; Table 5.6; Table 5.7; Table 5.8; Conclusion: A Shifting Landscape; Abbreviations; Notes; Bibliography; Index; Backcover
Summary: Based on a variety of archival and printed primary sources, this book examines how patriarchy functioned outside the confines of the family unit by scrutinizing the foundation on which nineteenth-century Cuban patriarchy rested.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HT1076 .F74 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1032854 Available EBL1032854

Frontcover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Patriarchy, Paternalism, and the Development of the Slave Society; 1 Virgins and Mothers; 2 Wives; 3 Pupils; Table 3.1; Table 3.2; Table 3.3; Figure 3.1; Figure 3.2; Table 3.4; 4 The Needy; 5 Wet Nurses; Table 5.1; Table 5.2; Table 5.3; Table 5.4; Table 5.5; Table 5.6; Table 5.7; Table 5.8; Conclusion: A Shifting Landscape; Abbreviations; Notes; Bibliography; Index; Backcover

Based on a variety of archival and printed primary sources, this book examines how patriarchy functioned outside the confines of the family unit by scrutinizing the foundation on which nineteenth-century Cuban patriarchy rested.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Franklin (Univ. of North Alabama) asserts that patriarchy was a tool to build and maintain an expanding slave society in 19th-century Cuba, exploring these connections through discussions of marriage, motherhood, education, charity, and wet-nursing. Particularly interesting is her discussion of how evidence on wet-nursing practices calls into question assumptions about the rates of slave reproduction in Cuba. Mostly, this book provides a top-down examination of the ways in which elite women's association with motherhood and honor helped bolster Cuban claims to its being "civilized," despite its expanding African slave population. Franklin often compares 19th-century Cuban colonialism to studies of colonial Latin America or the US antebellum South. Strikingly absent, however, are references to excellent studies of gender, law, and honor in 19th-century Latin America, e.g., Sueann Caulfield, Sarah C. Chambers, and Lara Putnam, eds., Honor, Status, and Law in Modern Latin America (2005) and Arlene J. Diaz, Female Citizens, Patriarchs, and the Law in Venezuela, 1786-1904 (CH, Dec'04, 42-2377). Franklin's work offers a solid discussion of gender and power in Cuban history, but it fails to show how this advances scholarly inquiry more generally. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. E. O'Connor Bridgewater State University

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