Women of Two Countries : German-American Women, Women''s Rights and Nativism, 1848-1890

By: Bank, MichaelaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandTransatlantic Perspectives: Publisher: New York, NY : Berghahn Books, 2012Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (200 p.)ISBN: 9780857455130Subject(s): Anneke, Mathilde Franziska Giesler | Anneke, Mathilde Franziska Giesler, 1817-1884 | German American women | German American women - Political activity - History - 19th century | Nativism - History - 19th century | Neymann, Clara | Neymann, Clara, b. 1840 | Wendt, Mathilde | Wendt, Mathilde | Women immigrants - Political activity - United States - History - 19th century | Women immigrants - United States | Women political activists - United States | Women''s rights - United States - History - 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women of Two Countries : German-American Women, Women''s Rights and Nativism, 1848-1890DDC classification: 323.3408931073 | 973.0431 | 973/.0431 LOC classification: E184.G3 B27 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1-A German-American Movement: Critical Opponents; Chapter 2-Mathilde Franziska Anneke: Powerful Translator; Chapter 3-Clara Neymann: Transatlantic Messenger; Chapter 4-The Transatlantic Space of "Women of Two Countries"; Bibliography; Index
Summary: German-American women played many roles in the US women's rights movement from 1848 to 1890. This book focuses on three figures-Mathilde Wendt, Mathilde Franziska Anneke, and Clara Neymann-who were simultaneously included and excluded from the nativist women's rights movement. Accordingly, their roles and arguments differed from those of their American colleagues, such as Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, or Lucy Stone. Moreover, German-American feminists were confronted with the opposition to the women's rights movement in their ethnic community of German-Americans. As outsiders in the women's rights movement they became critics; as "women of two countries" they became translators of feminist and ethnic concerns between German- Americans and the US women's rights movement; and as messengers they could bridge the gap between American and German women in a transatlantic space. This book explores the relationship between ethnicity and gender and deepens our understanding of nineteenth-century transatlantic relationships.
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E184.G3 B27 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1040770 Available EBL1040770

Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1-A German-American Movement: Critical Opponents; Chapter 2-Mathilde Franziska Anneke: Powerful Translator; Chapter 3-Clara Neymann: Transatlantic Messenger; Chapter 4-The Transatlantic Space of "Women of Two Countries"; Bibliography; Index

German-American women played many roles in the US women's rights movement from 1848 to 1890. This book focuses on three figures-Mathilde Wendt, Mathilde Franziska Anneke, and Clara Neymann-who were simultaneously included and excluded from the nativist women's rights movement. Accordingly, their roles and arguments differed from those of their American colleagues, such as Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, or Lucy Stone. Moreover, German-American feminists were confronted with the opposition to the women's rights movement in their ethnic community of German-Americans. As outsiders in the women's rights movement they became critics; as "women of two countries" they became translators of feminist and ethnic concerns between German- Americans and the US women's rights movement; and as messengers they could bridge the gap between American and German women in a transatlantic space. This book explores the relationship between ethnicity and gender and deepens our understanding of nineteenth-century transatlantic relationships.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michaela Bank received her doctoral degree in American Studies from Goethe-University in Frankfurt/Main, Germany in 2009. She was a fellow in the graduate research training group "Public Spheres and Gender Relations" funded by the German Research Foundation from 2005 to 2008. From 2008 to 2010 she was a lecturer of American history and gender studies at Goethe-University in Frankfurt/Main.

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