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What is a Woman to Do? : A Reader on Women, Work and Art, c. 1830-1890

By: Hadjiafxendi, Kyriaki.
Contributor(s): Zakreski, Patricia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Peter Lang AG, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften, 2011Description: 1 online resource (410 p.).ISBN: 9783035300628.Subject(s): Middle class women -- Employment -- England -- History -- 19th century | Women -- England -- History -- 19th century | Women artists -- England -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: What is a Woman to Do? : A Reader on Women, Work and Art, c. 1830-1890DDC classification: 331.48170094 | 331.48170094209034 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgements xiii; Editors' Note xv; Introduction: Art and Economics for the Middle-Class Woman 1; Section One Negotiating the Domestic Ideal 15; Introduction 17; [Sarah Lewis], Woman's Mission (1839) 21; Marion Reid, A Plea for Women (1843) 27; 'Advice to the Ladies', Eliza Cook's Journal (1850) 35; Barbara Leigh Smith [Bodichon], Women and Work (1857) 39; [Dinah Mulock Craik], A Woman's Thoughts about Women (1858) 47; [Harriet Martineau], 'Female Industry', Edinburgh Review (1859) 57; Florence Nightingale, 'Cassandra' (1860) 63
A. R. L., 'Facts Versus Ideas', English Woman's Journal (1861) 69[Dora Greenwell], 'Our Single Women', North British Review (1862) 75; Charlotte Mary Yonge, 'Money-Making', Womankind (1877) 83; Emily Pfeif fer, Women and Work. An Essay, etc. (1888) 89; Section Two The Feminine Aesthetic 97; Introduction 99; Frances Anne Butler [Fanny Kemble], Journal (1835) 103; M. A. [Mary Ann] Stodart, Female Writers: Thoughts on Their Proper Sphere, and Their Powers of Usefulness (1842) 109; R. H. [Richard Hengist] Horne, A New Spirit of the Age (1844) 113
[Anne Richelieu Lamb Dryden], Can Woman Regenerate Society? (1844) 119Currer Bell [Charlotte Brontë], 'Editor's Preface to the New Edition of Wuthering Heights' (1850) 127; Anna Mary Howitt, An Art Student in Munich (1853) 133; [George Eliot], 'Woman in France: Madame de Sablé', Westminster Review (1854) 139; Elizabeth Strutt, The Feminine Soul: Its Nature and Attributes. With Thoughts upon Marriage, and Friendly Hints upon Feminine Duties (1857) 147; R. H. [Richard Holt] Hutton, 'Novels by the Authoress of John Halifax', North British Review (1858) 155
F. T. [Francis Turner] Palgrave, 'Women and the Fine Arts', Macmillan's Magazine (1865) 161[Anne Thackeray Ritchie], 'Heroines and their Grandmothers', Cornhill Magazine (1865) 169; [Anne Mozley], 'Clever Women', Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (1868) 175; G. F. [George Frederic] Watts, 'Art Needlework', Nineteenth Century (1881) 183; 'The Woman's Part in Domestic Decoration', Magazine of Art (1881) 187; Section Three From Pastime to Profession 193; Introduction 195
[George Henry Lewes], 'The Conditions of Authors in England, Germany, and France', Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country (1847) 199S. [Sarah Anderton], 'A Few Words about Actresses and the Profession of the Stage', English Woman's Journal (1859) 205; J. [John] Stewart, 'Art-Decoration, A Suitable Employment for Women', Art Journal (1860) 211; F., 'A Plea for Minerva', The Rose, the Shamrock and the Thistle (1864) 219; Bessie Rayner Parkes, Essays on Woman's Work (1865) 223; 'Photography as an Employment for Women', Englishwoman's Review (1867) 231
J. [John] Cordy Jeaf freson, 'Female Artists and the Art-Schools of England', Art Pictorial and Industrial (1870) 235
Summary: This anthology contributes to a scholarly understanding of the aesthetics and economics of female artistic labour in the Victorian period. It maps out the evolution of the Woman Question in a number of areas, including the status and suitability of artistic professions for women, their engagement with new forms of work and their changing relationship to the public sphere. The wealth of material gathered here - from autobiographies, conduct manuals, diaries, periodical articles, prefaces and travelogues - traces the extensive debate on women''s art, feminism and economics from the 1830s to the 1890s. Combining for the first time nineteenth-century criticism on literature and the visual arts, performance and craftsmanship, the selected material reveals the different ideological positions surrounding the transition of women from idleness to serious occupation. The distinctive primary sources explore the impact of artistic labour upon perceptions of feminine sensibility and aesthetics, the conflicting views of women towards the pragmatics of their own creative labour as they encompassed vocations, trades and professions, and the complex relationship between paid labour and female fame and notoriety.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6136 .W37 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1053944 Available EBL1053944

Contents; Acknowledgements xiii; Editors' Note xv; Introduction: Art and Economics for the Middle-Class Woman 1; Section One Negotiating the Domestic Ideal 15; Introduction 17; [Sarah Lewis], Woman's Mission (1839) 21; Marion Reid, A Plea for Women (1843) 27; 'Advice to the Ladies', Eliza Cook's Journal (1850) 35; Barbara Leigh Smith [Bodichon], Women and Work (1857) 39; [Dinah Mulock Craik], A Woman's Thoughts about Women (1858) 47; [Harriet Martineau], 'Female Industry', Edinburgh Review (1859) 57; Florence Nightingale, 'Cassandra' (1860) 63

A. R. L., 'Facts Versus Ideas', English Woman's Journal (1861) 69[Dora Greenwell], 'Our Single Women', North British Review (1862) 75; Charlotte Mary Yonge, 'Money-Making', Womankind (1877) 83; Emily Pfeif fer, Women and Work. An Essay, etc. (1888) 89; Section Two The Feminine Aesthetic 97; Introduction 99; Frances Anne Butler [Fanny Kemble], Journal (1835) 103; M. A. [Mary Ann] Stodart, Female Writers: Thoughts on Their Proper Sphere, and Their Powers of Usefulness (1842) 109; R. H. [Richard Hengist] Horne, A New Spirit of the Age (1844) 113

[Anne Richelieu Lamb Dryden], Can Woman Regenerate Society? (1844) 119Currer Bell [Charlotte Brontë], 'Editor's Preface to the New Edition of Wuthering Heights' (1850) 127; Anna Mary Howitt, An Art Student in Munich (1853) 133; [George Eliot], 'Woman in France: Madame de Sablé', Westminster Review (1854) 139; Elizabeth Strutt, The Feminine Soul: Its Nature and Attributes. With Thoughts upon Marriage, and Friendly Hints upon Feminine Duties (1857) 147; R. H. [Richard Holt] Hutton, 'Novels by the Authoress of John Halifax', North British Review (1858) 155

F. T. [Francis Turner] Palgrave, 'Women and the Fine Arts', Macmillan's Magazine (1865) 161[Anne Thackeray Ritchie], 'Heroines and their Grandmothers', Cornhill Magazine (1865) 169; [Anne Mozley], 'Clever Women', Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (1868) 175; G. F. [George Frederic] Watts, 'Art Needlework', Nineteenth Century (1881) 183; 'The Woman's Part in Domestic Decoration', Magazine of Art (1881) 187; Section Three From Pastime to Profession 193; Introduction 195

[George Henry Lewes], 'The Conditions of Authors in England, Germany, and France', Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country (1847) 199S. [Sarah Anderton], 'A Few Words about Actresses and the Profession of the Stage', English Woman's Journal (1859) 205; J. [John] Stewart, 'Art-Decoration, A Suitable Employment for Women', Art Journal (1860) 211; F., 'A Plea for Minerva', The Rose, the Shamrock and the Thistle (1864) 219; Bessie Rayner Parkes, Essays on Woman's Work (1865) 223; 'Photography as an Employment for Women', Englishwoman's Review (1867) 231

J. [John] Cordy Jeaf freson, 'Female Artists and the Art-Schools of England', Art Pictorial and Industrial (1870) 235

This anthology contributes to a scholarly understanding of the aesthetics and economics of female artistic labour in the Victorian period. It maps out the evolution of the Woman Question in a number of areas, including the status and suitability of artistic professions for women, their engagement with new forms of work and their changing relationship to the public sphere. The wealth of material gathered here - from autobiographies, conduct manuals, diaries, periodical articles, prefaces and travelogues - traces the extensive debate on women''s art, feminism and economics from the 1830s to the 1890s. Combining for the first time nineteenth-century criticism on literature and the visual arts, performance and craftsmanship, the selected material reveals the different ideological positions surrounding the transition of women from idleness to serious occupation. The distinctive primary sources explore the impact of artistic labour upon perceptions of feminine sensibility and aesthetics, the conflicting views of women towards the pragmatics of their own creative labour as they encompassed vocations, trades and professions, and the complex relationship between paid labour and female fame and notoriety.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kyriaki Hadjiafxendi is Lecturer in Victorian Literature and Culture at the University of Stirling. Her publications include the co-edited collection Authorship in Context: From the Theoretical to the Material (2007). She is currently working on a monograph on George Eliot, the nineteenth-century literary marketplace and sympathy.<br> Patricia Zakreski is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of English at the University of Exeter. She is the author of Representing Female Artistic Labour: Refining Work for the Middle-Class Woman (2006). Her current project concerns the relationship between nineteenth-century industrial design and women's writing.

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