French Revolution and the British Novel in the Romantic Period.

By: Cousins, A. DContributor(s): Napton, Dani | Russo, StephanieMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandStudies on Themes and Motifs in Literature: Publisher: New York : Peter Lang Publishing Inc., 2011Description: 1 online resource (222 p.)ISBN: 9781453902417Subject(s): English fiction -- 18th century -- History and criticism -- Theory, etc | English fiction -- French influences | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Literature and the revolution | Romanticism -- EnglandGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: French Revolution and the British Novel in the Romantic PeriodDDC classification: 823/.609358 LOC classification: PR858.F7 -- F74 2012ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction The French Revolution and the British Novel in the Romantic Period A. D. Cousins, Dani Napton and Stephanie Russo, Macquarie University 1 -- Chapter 1 'Very Naughty Doctrines': Children, Children's Literature, Politics and the French Revolution Crisis M. O. Grenby, Newcastle University 15 -- Chapter 2 'A People Driven By Terror': Charlotte Smith, The Banished Man and the Politics of Counter-Revolution Stephanie Russo, Macquarie University 37
Chapter 3 'The Sentiments I Have Embodied': Wollstonecraft's Feminist Adaptation of the Revolutionary Novel Gary Kelly, University of Alberta 55 -- Chapter 4 'In a State of Terrour and Misery Indescribable': Violence, Madness and Revolution in the novels of Frances Burney Stephanie Russo and A. D. Cousins, Macquarie University 83 -- Chapter 5 'Educated in Masculine Habits': Mary Robinson, Androgyny, and the Ideal Woman Stephanie Russo and A. D. Cousins, Macquarie University 101
Chapter 6 Revolutionary and Counter-Revolutionary Agency in Scott's Woodstock and Peveril of the Peak Dani Napton, Macquarie University 113 -- Chapter 7 Revolution at a Distance: Jane Austen and Personalised History Chris Danta, University of New South Wales 137 -- Chapter 8 Towards Rehabilitating 'The Long Blighted Tree of Knowledge': Mary Shelley's Revolutionary Concept of Self-Governance and Dominion in The Last Man Michael Ackland, James Cook University 153
Chapter 9 'Adapted to Her Meridian': The Novel, The Woman Reader, and the French Revolution Deirdre Coleman, University of Melbourne 179 -- Bibliography 187 -- Notes on Contributors 203 -- Index 205
Summary: This book is a major reassessment of the French Revolution's impact on the English novel of the Romantic period. Focusing particularly - but by no means exclusively - on women writers of the time, it explores the enthusiasm, wariness, or hostility with which the Revolution was interpreted and represented for then-contemporary readers. A team of international scholars study how English Romantic novelists sought to guide the British response to an event that seemed likely to turn the world upside down.
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Contents -- Introduction The French Revolution and the British Novel in the Romantic Period A. D. Cousins, Dani Napton and Stephanie Russo, Macquarie University 1 -- Chapter 1 'Very Naughty Doctrines': Children, Children's Literature, Politics and the French Revolution Crisis M. O. Grenby, Newcastle University 15 -- Chapter 2 'A People Driven By Terror': Charlotte Smith, The Banished Man and the Politics of Counter-Revolution Stephanie Russo, Macquarie University 37

Chapter 3 'The Sentiments I Have Embodied': Wollstonecraft's Feminist Adaptation of the Revolutionary Novel Gary Kelly, University of Alberta 55 -- Chapter 4 'In a State of Terrour and Misery Indescribable': Violence, Madness and Revolution in the novels of Frances Burney Stephanie Russo and A. D. Cousins, Macquarie University 83 -- Chapter 5 'Educated in Masculine Habits': Mary Robinson, Androgyny, and the Ideal Woman Stephanie Russo and A. D. Cousins, Macquarie University 101

Chapter 6 Revolutionary and Counter-Revolutionary Agency in Scott's Woodstock and Peveril of the Peak Dani Napton, Macquarie University 113 -- Chapter 7 Revolution at a Distance: Jane Austen and Personalised History Chris Danta, University of New South Wales 137 -- Chapter 8 Towards Rehabilitating 'The Long Blighted Tree of Knowledge': Mary Shelley's Revolutionary Concept of Self-Governance and Dominion in The Last Man Michael Ackland, James Cook University 153

Chapter 9 'Adapted to Her Meridian': The Novel, The Woman Reader, and the French Revolution Deirdre Coleman, University of Melbourne 179 -- Bibliography 187 -- Notes on Contributors 203 -- Index 205

This book is a major reassessment of the French Revolution's impact on the English novel of the Romantic period. Focusing particularly - but by no means exclusively - on women writers of the time, it explores the enthusiasm, wariness, or hostility with which the Revolution was interpreted and represented for then-contemporary readers. A team of international scholars study how English Romantic novelists sought to guide the British response to an event that seemed likely to turn the world upside down.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

A. D. Cousins is Professor of English at Macquarie University, Australia. A member of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, he has published widely on early modern British literature and culture; his most recent publication is The Cambridge Companion to the Sonnet (with Peter Howarth).
Dani Napton is an honorary associate at Macquarie University. Her research is focused on English non-dramatic literature and culture from 1750 to 1900, with special attention to the history of ideas, rhetorical theory and practice, genre, landscape/place narrative and political theory, and historiography and representations of revolution and counterrevolution.
Stephanie Russo is a lecturer at Macquarie University. Her research is focused on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century novel, particularly on gender, politics, the history of ideas, and representations of revolution and counter-revolution.

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